Hours and Payroll

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Sep 28, 2016
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Are other retailers as tight w payroll as Target is or is this just a Spot exclusive? We spent until 830 this morning pushing pp2 a room the day before. At 10, before the truck is done, our 4 hours is up and we get sent home. Dayside GM I guess is going to finish it during the day today. No one on that team has unloaded the truck before or been on the line sorting. Inbound wants to stay but nope, not enough hours.

Is Target so desperate for money that they can't see that sending TMs home while product guests want is still on the truck going to cost them sales?

As long as everyone is pulling their own weight and there is work to be done, and employees willing to do it, then let them stay and get it done.

If I'm running a business and I have customers wanting to buy my products I'm going to keep my employees working until we've served everyone. I'm not going to essentially say, sorry, come back tomorrow, we've spent all our payroll today. Guests are coming in wanting things that are still on the truck. When we don't have it on the shelf they are going elsewhere. Why doesn't Target see this? Again, is all of retail like this?
 
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I wish there was a way to track lost sales. The other day while pushing pp2 from the day before (so we have empty vehicles to start the truck) a guest asks me if we have a certain size, brand of diapers. I check and there are 6 boxes on the truck. I tell them that and that it'd probably be about 3-4 hours before it's on the shelf. The obviously aren't going to wait and instead of leaving the store w two boxes of diapers their response to me was 'we'll just go to Walmart.'

I've never worked for another retailer but it just seems like Target is payroll crazy and doesn't realize that it might cost a little bit more to have a few extra TMs working but in the long run sales will increase.
 
Joined
Sep 27, 2018
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Same yesterday. The OTC overhaul required a whole section to be staged out back - no way around it without adding payroll to get it out since it had nowhere to go til the section was SET. Lost sales and angry guests, but hey, we saved 4 hours payroll. Sales would have been MORE than payroll spent from the number of requests we got for the product off the floor. SIGH. We do as much as we can.....but more is . Just. Not. Possible. Sorry.
 
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Same yesterday. The OTC overhaul required a whole section to be staged out back - no way around it without adding payroll to get it out since it had nowhere to go til the section was SET. Lost sales and angry guests, but hey, we saved 4 hours payroll. Sales would have been MORE than payroll spent from the number of requests we got for the product off the floor. SIGH. We do as much as we can.....but more is . Just. Not. Possible. Sorry.
Did no one consider leaving the vehicle(s) of items out on the salesfloor instead of in back? That's what we did for an entire OTC pog for 2 days while we moved everything around. Still accessible to guests and for team members to assist guests in finding the item they were looking for without sacrificing more than a couple minutes here and there.
 

busyzoningtoys

Closing Lead
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Did no one consider leaving the vehicle(s) of items out on the salesfloor instead of in back? That's what we did for an entire OTC pog for 2 days while we moved everything around. Still accessible to guests and for team members to assist guests in finding the item they were looking for without sacrificing more than a couple minutes here and there.
Not very brand, though.
 
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Did no one consider leaving the vehicle(s) of items out on the salesfloor instead of in back? That's what we did for an entire OTC pog for 2 days while we moved everything around. Still accessible to guests and for team members to assist guests in finding the item they were looking for without sacrificing more than a couple minutes here and there.
Folks Outside my area leave freight on the floor & go home. No communication is done by those folks. I take them off the floor & let the lod know. My folks get everything done & leave notes saying status, if not finished.
 

seasonaldude

Hitting All Items Scanned
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Did no one consider leaving the vehicle(s) of items out on the salesfloor instead of in back? That's what we did for an entire OTC pog for 2 days while we moved everything around. Still accessible to guests and for team members to assist guests in finding the item they were looking for without sacrificing more than a couple minutes here and there.
As someone who spent a lot of time digging through POG's repack boxes this week, I'd challenge the couple of minutes here and there. Hurt us in other areas of the store as well because we kept having to call salesfloor TMs to jump into OPU. Everything got pulled from the shelves and the backroom. No one was given the hours to push it all though.
 
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Did no one consider leaving the vehicle(s) of items out on the salesfloor instead of in back? That's what we did for an entire OTC pog for 2 days while we moved everything around. Still accessible to guests and for team members to assist guests in finding the item they were looking for without sacrificing more than a couple minutes here and there.
Would have preferred to believe me. Even asked for an amplified gifting cart to stage stuff out of place onto. Told NO vehicles: choice was repacks in back room or on shelf only, no other options. Some areas needed to be de-merched to open an area to set, once moves were made we tried to get the section set for the original merch in new home but didn’t always get it finished due to change in shelves, pushers, no label strips, too few tm to do it all in the same day....sigh.
 
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I had asked about using an amp gifting cart too, but got shot down. So I didn't ask about leaving the vehicles out there, I just did it and leadership all knew it was there as I communicated it to all of them after it was done. Each repack box was one brand or type of pain meds, labeled on the outside to minimize time spent digging. Most people just wanted Tylenol or melatonin, easy to find.

While it was not very brand, it was the preferred method to ensure items were available to guests; leadership at my store does not like anything brought to the back- it has to stay on the floor. We had ample time to help guests, move/set the aisles, work the fill back, and pull/work the batches and any freight.
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2018
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It really makes no sense whatsoever. If someone from corporate is reading this--do the math! At my store there are probably 20 flow team members (or less). If they gave each one of us 10 extra hours a week that'd cost them . . . $2,600!! $2,600 for a store that makes at least $250,000 a day!!!

I'm positive that we're losing more than that in lost sales. My store alone has like a hundred softline repack boxes cluttering the backroom, and tons of other shit to the point where you have to walk sideways back there like Indian Jones squeezing between two large rocks!

We used to have everything pushed by 8 AM! Now there are still u-boats and crap on the at floor at 2 PM. My store looks so trashy now and guests are complaining. It's like Target is running some kind of sick experiment to see how much they can get away with. At the rate we're going there will be a lawsuit against our store because I've seen u-boats almost fall on kids too many times. It's a fucking hazard and just seeing all of this makes me wish we'd go the way of Toys R Us.

I get it--the new system works from some stores. But this one size fits all approach isn't right. Target has this, "Fall in line, or get out," approach and it's just hurting them in the end. Even the ETLs know that the current system is a joke, but they have to stay positive. I feel for them the most because if I quit or get fired it really won't matter because I'm getting less than 20 hours a week. The other day one lead complained that he has to come in super early to finish the truck and I laughed in his face and said, "At least you're making enough to support your family," then walked away. Don't whine to me because you have to come in early, buddy. I'd do it to if they allowed me! I'd gladly work over 40 hours a week lol

TL;DR: The username has never been more accurate lol
 
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I found a payslip from around 2002-2003 the other day. I got over 100 hours for those two weeks. There was work to be done and my managers had no problem giving OT and extra hours if there was legitimate need.
Fast forward to today and everything is 'this should take you x hours' and 'payroll is tight, don't go a minute past your shift end.' Our store looked great then, great by 8 as they said. Now there's so much unpushed freight in the back, carts of backstock there all week, etc. Apparently they hired someone whose belief it was to cut payroll at any cost.
 

Times Up

Formerly PassinTime
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I’m inbound and signing and have been getting less than 10 hours a week since the end of December. I’ve worked other retail jobs and have never seen anything this bad.
What kind of hours were you averaging in Q3?
 

Times Up

Formerly PassinTime
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I found a payslip from around 2002-2003 the other day. I got over 100 hours for those two weeks.
Retail has changed alot in the last 2 DECADES. Some has been caused by the economic downturn in 2008, some by Walmart, and alot by Amazon. Today's consumers want everything cheap. Target needs to change significantly in order to survive.

Time to update your job skills and resume.
Your store's leadership has already decided how you fit into Target's future.
 
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I found a payslip from around 2002-2003 the other day. I got over 100 hours for those two weeks. There was work to be done and my managers had no problem giving OT and extra hours if there was legitimate need.
Fast forward to today and everything is 'this should take you x hours' and 'payroll is tight, don't go a minute past your shift end.' Our store looked great then, great by 8 as they said. Now there's so much unpushed freight in the back, carts of backstock there all week, etc. Apparently they hired someone whose belief it was to cut payroll at any cost.
Yes, in the last 15 years retail has changed dramatically.

There was 2008, but then we also have much more advanced data processing systems. That means more access to "how long it should take" and the ability to use a computer to map out exactly how much payroll each task needs in a way that just wasn't done in 2003. In 2003 we weren't given information three weeks out on how many boxes, we weren't sorting trucks the way we do now, warehouses weren't sending pallets specific to the exact aisle in YOUR store. Working backstock meant dragging an entire u-boat or flat out to the floor and finding out what fit, and hoping you weren't wasting half your day on stuff that didn't fit.

In 2003, many companies still used physical hand-written orders. You couldn't just scan a box and have it walk you to the exact spot on the exact shelf in the exact aisle your product went. You had to know all that in your head. Communication was via conference call (three times weekly) and things like Workbench weren't even thought of.

In 2003, I managed a store where I had to hand-write slips of defects and fax them in to corporate. You wanted to know how much something cost? It had to be walked up to the register to be scanned, and that in a state with mandatory individual ticketing laws!

So yes, you had to have more payroll and give people more hours because there was no INFORMATION available and everything had to be memorized. That's not the world we are in today, and if you think it is you probably need some career coaching.
 
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Yes, in the last 15 years retail has changed dramatically.

There was 2008, but then we also have much more advanced data processing systems. That means more access to "how long it should take" and the ability to use a computer to map out exactly how much payroll each task needs in a way that just wasn't done in 2003. In 2003 we weren't given information three weeks out on how many boxes, we weren't sorting trucks the way we do now, warehouses weren't sending pallets specific to the exact aisle in YOUR store. Working backstock meant dragging an entire u-boat or flat out to the floor and finding out what fit, and hoping you weren't wasting half your day on stuff that didn't fit.

In 2003, many companies still used physical hand-written orders. You couldn't just scan a box and have it walk you to the exact spot on the exact shelf in the exact aisle your product went. You had to know all that in your head. Communication was via conference call (three times weekly) and things like Workbench weren't even thought of.

In 2003, I managed a store where I had to hand-write slips of defects and fax them in to corporate. You wanted to know how much something cost? It had to be walked up to the register to be scanned, and that in a state with mandatory individual ticketing laws!

So yes, you had to have more payroll and give people more hours because there was no INFORMATION available and everything had to be memorized. That's not the world we are in today, and if you think it is you probably need some career coaching.
I don't need information to tell me it's a bad plan to have pallets of unpushed product blocking whole aisles on the salesfloor at 2pm on Saturday. A recent visit to a neighboring store. Gosh, do I climb over the pallets to buy my jersey or send a small child back there to get it? I could ask someone to move it, but they can't because they are all on lanes.

55.jpeg
 
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I don't need information to tell me it's a bad plan to have pallets of unpushed product blocking whole aisles on the salesfloor at 2pm on Saturday. A recent visit to a neighboring store. Gosh, do I climb over the pallets to buy my jersey or send a small child back there to get it? I could ask someone to move it, but they can't because they are all on lanes.

View attachment 7737

Why do you have pallets on the Salesfloor? Five pallets at that blocking everything. This never occurs once in our store and if it did I would indeed have a conversation with my team, but I guess ASANTS
 
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Why do you have pallets on the Salesfloor? Five pallets at that blocking everything. This never occurs once in our store and if it did I would indeed have a conversation with my team, but I guess ASANTS
Not at my store. I took a picture from a neighboring store. But at my store, the bulk water/beer/ice cream wall is routinely blocked well after the truck is done unloaded. Why? Bad plan from corporate. Just because one or two or 100 stores can make this work, doesn't every store can. Our "backroom" is on the side of the store, not the rear. There simply is no where else to put it.
 
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Why do you have pallets on the Salesfloor? Five pallets at that blocking everything. This never occurs once in our store and if it did I would indeed have a conversation with my team, but I guess ASANTS
And are you saying you NEVER put any pallets on the salesfloor or just that they aren't there after the store is open?
 
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And are you saying you NEVER put any pallets on the salesfloor or just that they aren't there after the store is open?
I assumed that picture was taken during business hours and if it wasn’t then my apologies. My comment was inferring that yes, during business hours we don’t have pallets all blocked up on the floor. The only exception are items that can not at all be pushed on a flat or Uboat.
 
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