Archived New Sales Floor TM

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Hi all. I just started my sales floor training yesterday morning, and I'm still a bit confused on something. I was using the PDA to do the re-shop, and I was finding the item location more or less by finding the same item on the shelf. Could anyone tell me how to read the Item Location readout on the PDA? Thank you! :)
 

buliSBI

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On the PDA or the Item Scanners, planogram location will read Aisle## (?) *-*-* (Section#-Shelf#-ShelfPosition#). The (?) is a good indicator if it will be on the aisle, endcap, or on a special peg hook.

Ex. If an item comes up A10 3-5-2. The item is located down on the A10 aisle, 3rd 6' section from the main aisle, 5th shelf up, and around the 2 item on the shelf. Planogram isn't 100% accurate. Some planogram numbering can crossover to the adjancent aisle or may be in reverse. But it will get you fairly close.

Once you learn plaogram, and get the zoning process, you will pretty much start knowing where items go without scanning them.

If you get a weird (99) or something else, it usually like a encap or special display.
 

TronixRockstar

Elec/MMB Trainer
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If the location is E33(0), then it is the endcap of E33. (0) is always the endcap. Odd number aisle endcaps face main aisle, even aisles are back of the aisles. (99) are endcaps. If the middle number has a P in it, then it is a Peg. They are usually numbered in order in the same four foot section. You can also match up the schematic location on the PDA on the label shelf :), and double check the DPCI.
 

mrknownothing

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(99) represents a sidecap, not an endcap. If the last number in the schematic is a decimal, you may have to look for it because decimals are not always in order due to POG revisions. If the aisle number is higher than the number on the last gondola, then the location you're looking for will be on the back wall of that block.

Usually, inline aisle locations will start with (1), but if the number in parentheses is not 1, 0, or 99, then that is the 4-ft section you start counting from. Example: A27(6)2-1-3 Go to the 6th section of aisle A27 and that is your "first" section that you count. The "second" section in this case is actually the seventh. It can be confusing at first, but the reason they do it that way is because each (1) in the same aisle is the beginning of a separate planogram - generally a different type of item.
 
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The system is slightly confusing at first but is very easy to get used to once you learn it. It is MUCH better than the old line number system we had.

The old system would give you the POG #, the aisle it was tied to, and then a number that indicated what order it was in. 1-1-1 would just be 001, 1-1-2 would be 002, and it would keep going up regardless of how many 4 foot sections the POG used. If the bottom shelf spanned 12 feet and had 10 DPCIs, they would go 001 to 010 and where 1-2-1 is now would be 011. This system was relatively workable until you got revisions. DPCIs added in a revision would receive a line number higher than the last one in the original POG. For example, a POG may have an initial set of 100 DPCIs (line #001-100). Two months later, a couple of new items get added to it as a revision. Regardless of where in that POG they actually got stocked, they would be assigned line numbers 101+, forcing you to hunt for the damn thing.
 
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Back wall system needs to be tweaked. Hate when the parenthesis number is a big number and then there's about 3 different short ones in that area.
 
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