Credit Card Authorization fun fact!

#1
Did you all know, that on the odd occasion that the POS prompts a cashier for which a guest has swiped a credit or debit card to call the 718 authorization number to complete the transaction, that the entire call can be bypassed? As opposed to calling the number to get the authorization code much like refund authorization and other, you can simply key in the 3-digit CVV2 (security code) on the back of the card.

Would you believe that one of my cart attendants found this out?

Cart attendants are smarter than they look (or act) ;)

One of my past STLs started as a CA!
 

buliSBI

Former Team Member
#2
Very against Best Practice.

The authorization process usually occurs to check ID when a card was used to make recent large purchase or a purchase was made outside the cardholders normal shopping area/hours.
 

talan123

Team Member/Troll
#3
Very against Best Practice.

The authorization process usually occurs to check ID when a card was used to make recent large purchase or a purchase was made outside the cardholders normal shopping area/hours.
It's usually against best practice. But when your computer dies..
 

mrknownothing

purveyor of things
#4
Did you all know, that on the odd occasion that the POS prompts a cashier for which a guest has swiped a credit or debit card to call the 718 authorization number to complete the transaction, that the entire call can be bypassed? As opposed to calling the number to get the authorization code much like refund authorization and other, you can simply key in the 3-digit CVV2 (security code) on the back of the card.

Would you believe that one of my cart attendants found this out?

Cart attendants are smarter than they look (or act) ;)

One of my past STLs started as a CA!
Does this only happen in certain stores? I've never seen it before. We've had the GSTL call some number if the register crashes, but I've never seen or heard about anything like this. The only prompts we get for credit transactions are checking ID ($200+) and entering the last 4 digits of the card number ($400+).
 

buliSBI

Former Team Member
#5
It doesn't happen too often. As I mentioned, it usually only comes up if the card holder's card company questions the transaction, thinks its a high risk transaction, or outside of the card holders normal shopping pattern. My banks locked up my cards and ask for authorization because I bought gas at the pump past midnight, or went out-of-state on vacation.

The POS will prompt you to call the 718 number or a specific bank. They may ask you to ID your store and register. Then they might ask you to verify the guests ID.

I even had it prompt for a transaction for a guest at Food Ave.
 

commiecorvus

Former Signing Ninja
Staff member
Moderator
#7
I had my Target check card not go through even though there was money in the account.
I was told by the bank that charge to Target hadn't been processed from the weekend and until they were the account wouldn't take anymore charges from Target.
So it was my bank not Target.
Wonder if the # thing would work.
 
#9
I wouldn't see why you wouldn't call for authorization. Especially in a time when new and emerging technologies are being developed for more practical applications, allowing devious people to get confidential information they shouldn't be able to get.

Call the number. The guest may be annoyed, but should be appreciative that somebody, somewhere, someway, is performing fraud duty.
 
#10
I can completely see where these ideas are coming from, and I recognize the security factor, and in all actuality, it will make me reconsider using the security code, but in my experience of probably 12 of these calls, I have never gotten more question than the store and register number which is already tied to the transaction anyway. I do see your points though.
 
#11
Did you all know, that on the odd occasion that the POS prompts a cashier for which a guest has swiped a credit or debit card to call the 718 authorization number to complete the transaction, that the entire call can be bypassed? As opposed to calling the number to get the authorization code much like refund authorization and other, you can simply key in the 3-digit CVV2 (security code) on the back of the card.

Would you believe that one of my cart attendants found this out?

Cart attendants are smarter than they look (or act) ;)

One of my past STLs started as a CA!
I just terminated someone for circumventing security procedures when a stolen credit card was used to purchase 2,000 worth of merchandise, and he did exactly what you just stated.... I don't recommend bypassing anything when it comes to calling authorization.
 

mrknownothing

purveyor of things
#12
It doesn't happen too often. As I mentioned, it usually only comes up if the card holder's card company questions the transaction, thinks its a high risk transaction, or outside of the card holders normal shopping pattern. My banks locked up my cards and ask for authorization because I bought gas at the pump past midnight, or went out-of-state on vacation.
In those situations, our registers just deny the card. They don't prompt us to call a number.
 

redeye58

Hasta Ba Rista, Baby!
#13
We had a lady who would go through newbies' line &, when that screen came up, would tell the noob that "Oh, I talked to my bank & they said to key in XXXX to clear it." And it would even tho it wasn't legit. She tried it when a GSTL was nearby & he said no, we have to call. Of course, she was denied (no surprise) & didn't come back to our store. Our AP emailed other stores to warn them as well.
 
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