Archived Produce

Status
Not open for further replies.

B26

Joined
Jul 31, 2012
Messages
118
Hey Guys,

I'll be going to produce in a few weeks at a Super Target. I looked for a guide but could not find one... Could someone let me know what I'll be doing, my core roles, etc. Thanks!
 

sigma7

Former ETL-All the Things
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Messages
2,415
I never really worked on the food side of my super other than zoning dry market, but I'd bet your major tasks will be culling and pushing produce, TPCing, and possibly doing the order if your TL doesn't do it or is over multiple areas.
 

B26

Joined
Jul 31, 2012
Messages
118
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
I never really worked on the food side of my super other than zoning dry market, but I'd bet your major tasks will be culling and pushing produce, TPCing, and possibly doing the order if your TL doesn't do it or is over multiple areas.

So what does culling and TPC mean? Haha
 

sigma7

Former ETL-All the Things
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Messages
2,415
Culling is when you go through the produce and pull all the bad fruit and vegetables and expired product. You make sure that what's on the floor is fresh. TPCing is putting things on temporary price cuts. If you have a ton of apples in the back that you won't sell through before you have to throw them away, you put them on a price cut to get them to move. The goal is to move everything you order out the front door thereby minimizing your QMOS (quantity markouts of stock). You'll be responsible for making sure that the produce area is full and impactful. I'm a PFresh Perishables Assistant and I was just hardlines at the super I worked at, so someone from a super can probably give you a better idea of what the job requires.
 
Joined
Nov 23, 2012
Messages
231
Culling is when you go through every bit of produce on the floor and check for bad ones...mold, damage, bruises, etc. And TPC is the acronym for Temporary Price Cut. For meat and produce, each store creates their own TPC for product that is about to expire or will go bad, or they simply need to sell through a little faster. My ETL always said we should order as accurately as we can, but it's better to take the small loss of a TPC than losing the entire product value by having to toss it.
 

Bored Food Aver

FORMER Food Aver
Joined
May 12, 2013
Messages
711
Hey Guys,

I'll be going to produce in a few weeks at a Super Target. I looked for a guide but could not find one... Could someone let me know what I'll be doing, my core roles, etc. Thanks!

If the store you work at is anything like mine, here's what you'll do:
Unload pallet of bananas.
Carry bananas to sales floor.
Stock bananas on floor.

Lather, rinse, repeat.

Also, throw in some love for the strawberries, wet wall, and refrigerated stuff (juices and salad mixes, etc.) And cut fruit.

But mostly bananas.

At least that's what I've had to do for most of the time I was over there.
 
Last edited:
Joined
May 8, 2013
Messages
5
Hey Guys,

I'll be going to produce in a few weeks at a Super Target. I looked for a guide but could not find one... Could someone let me know what I'll be doing, my core roles, etc. Thanks!

Hi! This is my first time posting on this actually lol. I worked in the produce department for a year (9 months ago) so I'll try to tell you as much as I remembered! Not every store has the same views on everything, of course.

In the mornings if you open, you'll go through all the dated produced (salads, dressings, cut fruit, veggie platters, etc) and make sure there's no outdates. Then go through all the tables and wet rack and cull and zone them...just making sure they look overall good. If it's a food truck day that contains produce, you'll usually be scheduled to come in earlier to work the pallets that are stored in the produce cooler. You label the boxes with the date that they arrived. Try to unload the boxes that can be pushed to the sales floor right away (anything that you're completely out of). Shortly after the store opens you'll get someone else to come in and help. One person works the pallets, and another person pushes. Always make sure you push anything that's empty first, then the high selling items. If it's a non truck day, in the mornings you should check the outdates, cull/zone the department, and then push empties/high selling produce.

During the afternoons all you really need to do is push and cull. My TL made culling a very high priority. Always make the front tables a priority as well. It's the first thing a guest sees.

At night is when zoning become a priority, I usually give myself 1.5/2 hours before closing to stop pushing and zone the entire department. It makes the opener's job easy to push in the morning. I check for outdates at nights, and about an hour before the store closes, you bring all of your QMOS (bad/expired produce) to the backroom to throw it in the garbage compactor. Make sure to cover the potatoes (and during the summer you cover the corn with wet towels).

Oh, and of course you're going to be expected to cover everyone's break in Starbucks and Food Ave. At least that's how it was for me. You'll be the first person the GSTL will call up to run register because you're the closest to the registers. It's really annoying when you have to cover Food Ave's break AND lunch, along with Starbucks break, and run register, and try to get your closing duties done at the same time... :wacko:


If you have any questions, feel free to PM me!
 

B26

Joined
Jul 31, 2012
Messages
118
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Well, great first post! :)

A lot of good information. Thanks to everyone who helped.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top