Archived Questions about sales floor

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jedijenchan

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OK, I was offered a sales floor TM position and I was just wondering what the schedule they give you is like(how long are the shifts, what hours you work, etc) is and what kind of work they have you do, aside from the job description and "flexible" schedule I hear about.

I'm guessing they expect you to work a lot of hours around the holidays.

I figure I would go to the experts here...

Thanks in advance for any help!
 
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The way they schedule you will vary a little by store, but you can expect to work anywhere from a 4 hour shift, up to an 8 hour shift. There are opening shifts (between 8am-2:30), Midday shifts (between 11a-7pm), and closing shifts (beginning at 2:30pm and ending between 10:30pm-12a depending on when your store closes). If you're scheduled to open, your morning LOD will usually have a task list for you to work on from the previous night's closing notes, and/or that morning's brand walk. That can include anything from PTMing an isle (moving around discontinued product and filling holes to make it look presentable), working out reshop, zoning, or setting endcaps. On Tuesdays and Thursdays (our non-truck days) we normally help push the morning autofills since we don't have a truck TM there to push them. At noon the hourly CAFs start dropping, and around 12:30 they're completed and ready to be pushed to the floor. At that time all morning tasks are expected to be completed, and then you transition into pushing pulls for the remainder of your shift.

If you're scheduled for a midday shift, the expectations are basically the same: reshop, pulls, etc. See your LOD when you clock in for any tasks they might have for you.

Closers have slightly different routines. When you clock in you'll help push pulls until 5pm. Once the last hourly batch is completed, you'll transition into zoning and working out reshop for the area assigned to you by your LOD. Zoning is basically doing damage control and getting the store back to "green" after a day's worth of guests shopping. If you're in hardlines, this means going through each isle and pulling product forward to the ends of the shelves (cover your diamonds!) and peghooks so it looks full, and removing any stray merchandise that doesn't belong there. If you're in softlines, you'll be refolding shirts on tables, picking up anything that's fallen onto the floor, sizing your racks in order, as well as evenly spacing out the merchandise on racks (referred to as finger-spacing).

Holiday hours do get a little crazy, usually starting around Halloween for us. I was hired on as seasonal before I was brought on full-time, and 12 hour days weren't uncommon for us during the 4th quarter... Wear comfy shoes!

And of course, sales floor team members are expected to be the first responders to calls for back-up, call buttons, phone calls, as well as helping guests find what they need and driving the "vibe" in the store. It sounds like a lot, but it's pretty easy once you get the hang of it. I loved working on the sales floor before I moved into the logistics side of the store.
 

jedijenchan

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As a GSA, I'm begging you... please respond to calls for backup on the front lanes. It gets a little hairy up there.

So, from this comment, i'm guessing that I will be cross trained to cashier as well? Funny, that wasn't in the job description because I have no cashier experience. I am up to the challenge, so I guess I'll do anything as long as i'm paid.

Anyway, thanks so very much for all the good info looseseal, it's good to know what i'm getting into. I'm glad I looked up the terminology, cause otherwise I would have totally been lost with your explanation. :laugh4:


Thanks again for being so helpful!
 
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If you are in hardlines:

Zoning
- Look at every item, working top to bottom (or vice versa) and do it on a per section (usually four feet) basis
- Cover all diamonds
- Turn all labels to face out
- Use grey dots (if you see one, the item in the location might not be correct)
- Don't move strays/foreign/re-shop to the appropriate aisle every time -- use your cart and leave items on the floor until you finish the aisle (some ETLs might not like this, maybe only do it after the store is closed)
- Organize your cart! Example: bottom tier = backstock, middle tier = strays and empty packages, hand basket = defectives, top tier = re-shop for your current department (this should be worked every time you change aisles if the items are within a five-aisle radius)
- Check multiple locations on the same aisle, don't leave holes if you have product on the shelf above/below
- Pegs are easy to zone, just use the grey dots
- You shouldn't need a PDA to tell if a product is in the wrong spot (most of the time the last five numbers are on the bottom left of the label, the assortment number near the UPC will be on the top right of label, and Target brands have DPCIs near the UPCs and sometimes on the front of the package)
- Know the department - zone where it gets shopped more first (if you have time to come back later) or last (if you only have enough time to get to each aisle once) - Example: Toys then Sporting Goods then Toys if you have time to go back
- Check empty endcaps for backroom locations, if none then pull from home, if no product - flex the endcap with like items, starting with d-code or NOP
- Zone clearance, please, just do it
- Remove grey dots in locations that have the correct item
- Always pull more than one item forward (minimum two, typically 3-4) - if everyone does this, the zone is maintained A LOT longer while being shopped
- Inventory control clips (round rubber things) on pegs should be pulled forward if there are few items on the peg - this greatly improves the look of a peg-heavy aisle

Returns/Re-shop/Strays
- If at all possible, get a PDA
- If you have a PDA, use RF Apps (NOP + toggle to Pricing, LOC, SUBT, etc.) - if you don't know why, you haven't used it enough
- Put the items in your cart yourself - you know how your thought process works more than other people, so you can work through the merchandise quicker (this is critical in HBA or Toys)
- If you don't have a PDA, park your cart near a price check machine (assuming you have the new ones that SF schemetics)
- Park your cart on an endcap, work all of the items within a five-aisle radius (three before, two after)
- Ask CIHYFS - chances are this isn't your first time working returns/re-shop, so you should be able to show guests where most items are
- Remove grey dots from empty locations that you are filling (some stores may not remove the dots if there is only one item, check with your Instocks or Hardlines Team Leaders)

CAF Push
- Fill your vehicle - if there are other vehicles with merchandise in nearby areas (or only a few items) you should grab them, you will save yourself time and effort
- Use the smart labels (that might not be the official term) that is on every single box - it tells you the DPCI, SF schematic, and item name
- Push your vehicle, don't pull it
- Don't stack your vehicle too high, running over a guest is a bad thing
- Learn your backroom (where different departments get backstocked, where to keep empty vehicles, etc.) - this makes backroom TMs' lives a lot easier
- Combine your backstock with nearby backstock vehicles, don't just throw a pink clip on it and walk away
- Keep your vehicle organized - separate backstock as you work, break down boxes, put trash (see: C/D blocks) in an empty box
- Don't overstock - the accumulator isn't perfect, please don't make it worse
- Remove grey dots from empty locations that you are filling

That's everything I have for now, Hardlinesmaster feel free to use any/all of it.

This is from a high volume store, other stores may function differently.

Edit: added a few more items.
 
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Almost everyone in the store should be trained as a cashier. The only exceptions I've ever seen are backroom TMs. It's not difficult, I promise. =)
 

buliSBI

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Depends on your store.

You might start off with cashier and salesfloor training and shadow other TMs. During the week, you might work 530 to close. Then weekends might be 230 to close.
 
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Lots of hours? Ha! Even with completely open availability you'll probably get scheduled around 25 hours/week at Christmas time... MAYBE pushing 30 hours if you're in a really busy, not well-staffed store.
 

mrknownothing

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Almost everyone in the store should be trained as a cashier. The only exceptions I've ever seen are backroom TMs. It's not difficult, I promise. =)

This. Logistics (i.e. backroom, flow if overnight) is the only area where you don't need to know how to cashier.
 

jedijenchan

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Almost everyone in the store should be trained as a cashier. The only exceptions I've ever seen are backroom TMs. It's not difficult, I promise. =)

Ah, ok. Yeah, all your really doing is swiping stuff over a bar code scanner, bagging, and offering redcards I suppose. Doesn't sound like rocket science to me, but eh..ya never know.

pharmtechno said:
Lots of hours? Ha! Even with completely open availability you'll probably get scheduled around 25 hours/week at Christmas time... MAYBE pushing 30 hours if you're in a really busy, not well-staffed store.

Well, they told me it was about 20-30 hours a week. I fully expect to be working weekends and evenings to close since I did say I was available 24/7.

Are 8 hour shifts common?

Again, thanks everyone for all the advice.
 

buliSBI

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Well, they told me it was about 20-30 hours a week. I fully expect to be working weekends and evenings to close since I did say I was available 24/7.

Are 8 hour shifts common?

Again, thanks everyone for all the advice.
It really all depends on your store. If its a high volume store, you will pretty much have a good supply hours. With lower volume stores, you could see hours vary greatly from week to week. Going into the holidays you will probably see some good hours, but afterwards you might get hardly scheduled.

I would highly suggest that once you complete your Salesfloor training to inquire about working in Electronics (especially if you have good knowledge base). You will have to pass the Electronics champion quiz in order to work in the area. Just for safety sake, cross train in any other areas if you want to pick up as many hours as possible.

Since you will be working salesfloor. Make sure they train you on how to pull items from the backroom properly, and you get signed off on it. Many TMs get half-arsed trained and without getting signed off, and get penalized for making a improper pull.
 

jedijenchan

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Well, they told me it was about 20-30 hours a week. I fully expect to be working weekends and evenings to close since I did say I was available 24/7.

Are 8 hour shifts common?

Again, thanks everyone for all the advice.
It really all depends on your store. If its a high volume store, you will pretty much have a good supply hours. With lower volume stores, you could see hours vary greatly from week to week. Going into the holidays you will probably see some good hours, but afterwards you might get hardly scheduled.

I would highly suggest that once you complete your Salesfloor training to inquire about working in Electronics (especially if you have good knowledge base). You will have to pass the Electronics champion quiz in order to work in the area. Just for safety sake, cross train in any other areas if you want to pick up as many hours as possible.

Since you will be working salesfloor. Make sure they train you on how to pull items from the backroom properly, and you get signed off on it. Many TMs get half-arsed trained and without getting signed off, and get penalized for making a improper pull.

Ah, thanks for the info! Electronics is where I'd love to be, since that is really my background. What's this Electronics champion quiz all about, may I ask?

Again, thanks for all the advice. I will make sure to ask a lot of questions on my first day (If they ever call me back about my background and drug tests).
 

doxie71

Former Perishables Assistant
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There is a quiz to work in electronics? I never took it...interesting. And I cross trained to work back there.
 

mrknownothing

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There is a quiz to work in electronics? I never took it...interesting. And I cross trained to work back there.

It covers the basics of many of the products, features, cables, etc. It helps if you already know the products, but the Electronics Champion training/quiz is a good place to start. I'm not sure if it's necessarily required (it probably varies by store), but it's better to take it than not to.
 

doxie71

Former Perishables Assistant
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There is a quiz to work in electronics? I never took it...interesting. And I cross trained to work back there.

It covers the basics of many of the products, features, cables, etc. It helps if you already know the products, but the Electronics Champion training/quiz is a good place to start. I'm not sure if it's necessarily required (it probably varies by store), but it's better to take it than not to.

Ahhh gotcha. May be why they didn't have me do it. I chatted electronics with my TL before I even asked to cross train.

And yes, cross train in every area you may have interest in. You never know what else you may like. And it shows you have initiative and drive. They love that. Plus then you can pick up shifts in more areas.
 
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Here's another bit of advice (aside from the good advice above)
Have a positive attitude, at least around TLs, ETLs, leadership people
If you are negative, complain a lot, etc you won't be their first pick to cross train, think about developing as a leader, etc.
it's okay to vent to your co-workers, but complaining and stuff with leaders is not a great idea.
 

adcamper92

Food Ave Deviant
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Working the salesfloor in the few times I've crosstrained over there it's pretty good from what I've encountered. Many of the people at mine store get comfy with a section and they tend to stay in that section when scheduled. Many of the TM's work 8 hour shifts, some as short as 4 hours. It just depends on how willing you are to work.

Mostly you help with guests finding items on the floor for them, responding to backup calls for cashiering when it gets packed with guests, and stocking, zoning, and depending on which part of the country you're at you'll put "strays"/"gobacks"/"reshop" back to the floor. All that means is stuff that gets tossed or the guest decides against it goes to a cart at the Service Desk to be reworked onto the floor and for some reason every region has it's own name for it.
 

doxie71

Former Perishables Assistant
Joined
Jun 14, 2013
Messages
510
Here's another bit of advice (aside from the good advice above)
Have a positive attitude, at least around TLs, ETLs, leadership people
If you are negative, complain a lot, etc you won't be their first pick to cross train, think about developing as a leader, etc.
it's okay to vent to your co-workers, but complaining and stuff with leaders is not a great idea.

THIS. I do vent to a few coworkers I've become friends with. However, unless I have a serious issues, I am always positive around anyone above me. I've been there since April & they are talking about putting me on the bench for TL.
 
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Well, they told me it was about 20-30 hours a week. I fully expect to be working weekends and evenings to close since I did say I was available 24/7.

Are 8 hour shifts common?

Again, thanks everyone for all the advice.
It really all depends on your store. If its a high volume store, you will pretty much have a good supply hours. With lower volume stores, you could see hours vary greatly from week to week. Going into the holidays you will probably see some good hours, but afterwards you might get hardly scheduled.

I would highly suggest that once you complete your Salesfloor training to inquire about working in Electronics (especially if you have good knowledge base). You will have to pass the Electronics champion quiz in order to work in the area. Just for safety sake, cross train in any other areas if you want to pick up as many hours as possible.

Since you will be working salesfloor. Make sure they train you on how to pull items from the backroom properly, and you get signed off on it. Many TMs get half-arsed trained and without getting signed off, and get penalized for making a improper pull.

I'm a cashier and I've never heard of the quiz. I inquired one of my GSTLs about electronics, and she said it was more dependent on RedCard sales. I suck at selling RedCards (I can convince a lot of people, but suck at closing the deal), but I know my stuff when it comes to electronics. Another guy was hired on as a cashier and he's really good at selling RedCards and she said she might recommend him for electronics. The same guy asked me one day what an hdmi cord is and if we sold them. Sigh.
 

jedijenchan

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Thanks again everyone for the advice and info. Today's orientation, so wish me luck!
 

jedijenchan

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Hey guys and gals. I was told by HR that Sales Floor is mostly nights to close, or an hour past close. I was not anticipating this. "close" is 11pm, which means I'd have to work until 12am. This is going to be a significant issue, because I rely on public transportation, and my bicycle for transportation. It's just not safe for me to use public transportation or ride my bike that late at night/morning. I just don't feel safe leaving when I won't have a solid, safe way to get home.

I don't have a problem with the hours other than worrying about getting home safe.

Advice?
 
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Hey guys and gals. I was told by HR that Sales Floor is mostly nights to close, or an hour past close. I was not anticipating this. "close" is 11pm, which means I'd have to work until 12am. This is going to be a significant issue, because I rely on public transportation, and my bicycle for transportation. It's just not safe for me to use public transportation or ride my bike that late at night/morning. I just don't feel safe leaving when I won't have a solid, safe way to get home.

I don't have a problem with the hours other than worrying about getting home safe.

Advice?

Take the bus to work and have someone pick you up.
 

buliSBI

Former Team Member
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They should have told you the expected hours at your interview. Did you let them know your what availability and travel arrangements were?

What about a moped?

How far are you from the store?
 
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commiecorvus

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I ride my bike at night all the time.
Don't have a choice since I don't drive.
It's not a joy but with proper lighting it can be done.
You can pick up a reflective vest for cheap.
I duct taped a light to my helmet as well as the one on my bike.
Have a flashing red light on the back and reflectors on your pedals and wheels.
Now if you want real fun, ride at night, in the winter, on black ice, at -10F in 40 MPH winds.
 
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