15 dolla make u holla (in despair)

can't touch this

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  • #52
$15/hr entry level is stupid.
Personally I’m a fan of how Australia does it, with different wage tiers according to age. If you’re under 18 you make $8.00, under 21 you make $14 and 21 and up make something like $22. Of course, Straya is an entirely different country so that wouldn’t necessarily carry over, but at least with their model businesses don’t have to pay a double digit wage to some tweenie who’s still living at home, while adults who actually need that schmoney are able to get it.
 

no nix nein

Queen of the Weekend Warriors
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Apr 30, 2018
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Yet Target wants open availability from these same people.
Yep yep. I changed my availability because I just had a baby and because my partner makes more and has a guaranteed 40hrs a week, I’m going to stay home most of the time and watch my little human. Target doesn’t give me a set schedule, set hours, or a guarantee of hours and childcare would cost me a little more than 2 checks if I go off the assumption of getting 35 hours, which I know I won’t. Annnnnyways, when I told Hr my new availability I was told not to expect to get scheduled all those days. Pffft, whatever. If I had open availability I probably would still get scheduled the same anyways. Lucky my partner has a stable job or I’d be fucked.

Also I make the coveted 15$/hr. My check amounts haven’t gone up in years and actually have gone down because hours. I got more on maternity leave because of how much I worked at the beginning of the year, and because they let me use vacation time over my average hours.

Anyways, once I clear up my debt I think I am going to transfer to a closer store and limit my availability more.
 
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15 is a long time away. 13 next.. .and then I guess 2 raises in 2020?

Just my 2 cents. I think Target will continue to drill down on stores, do more with fewer people, until they are solid with online sales and keeping pace on growth. Retail changed. We will see a lot of growing pains.

Again, my 2 cents. When I started at my store, I knew it as a shopper. I never would pop into target. Too slow. Now with order pu and sco, it's easier. Also, I never liked the cashiers. Not professional enough. I saw why when I went to work. No training in basics, like bagging. Way too many store policy rules and processes with 15 min training?

First thing I noticed, too, was how slow staff walks. I'm older than most, but dang, they are turtles! And I can tell you the 4 managers who know what they are doing, how to do it, and actually do it. The rest focus on blaming or petty stuff.

So yeah, it's going to change. Personally, I thought they were overstaffed. I still could cut several slots out and still deliver for guests. Beauty stands around all day. It's ridiculous.

I suspect that hustling for hours won't be attractive to quite a few people. But that's what they will have to do. Keep the ones who actually do most of the work fairly happy. Don't worry about the rest.

It's gotta happen, or Target won't survive this retail tsunami.
 
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Aredhel

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Feb 12, 2017
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The frustrating thing about that is there are a lot of people especially people with disabilities who want full time jobs but who can only get jobs in places like Target.
They need to make a living but are under employed and not being paid jack.
They need that $15.00 an hour.
We have people who are high functioning autism, who have gone to college but can't get past the interview stage and wind up with jobs well below what they have the skills for.
The unemployment rate for people with autism and a college education is 80%, so the idea of 'bettering yourself to move up is just mouth music.
And of those who are employed at least half are underemployed.

Paying a living wage is the least a company can do.
Giving decent hours is another.
Being aware of people who are neurodiverse and making the appropriate changes to your hiring practices would be the best thing.
The yellow vests are right around the corner.
 

Tessa120

I escaped the asylum!
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Mar 17, 2017
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If you want to make a decent paycheck then leverage the skills you have to find a place that will afford you. Wanting $15 an hour for following basic instruction is high key lazy. Everyone who wanted more is getting more, for a lot less. Have fun with that.
Your title says PMT. Unless there's something special the PMT does that I missed, then you're the same as the rest of us. Simply doing routine upkeep in the home means learning hand and power tools, learning how to paint walls so they are pretty and the floor isn't painted, drywall patching and replacement, fixing electrical glitches or bad wiring in a way that would satisfy code (if they ever checked), same with plumbing, same with interior renovations such as removing or adding walls, same with concrete pouring and crack fixing, figuring out how to troubleshoot and fix motors in all sorts of appliances, etc. Probably 90% of the people here can do what you can simply because when the electrical outlet went bad they called an older relative and asked how to safely take the entire outlet out and put in a new one or how to properly fix a pipe that just busted and just kept adding to that knowledge every little home upkeep quibble.
 
Joined
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145
The frustrating thing about that is there are a lot of people especially people with disabilities who want full time jobs but who can only get jobs in places like Target.
They need to make a living but are under employed and not being paid jack.
They need that $15.00 an hour.
We have people who are high functioning autism, who have gone to college but can't get past the interview stage and wind up with jobs well below what they have the skills for.
The unemployment rate for people with autism and a college education is 80%, so the idea of 'bettering yourself to move up is just mouth music.
And of those who are employed at least half are underemployed.

Paying a living wage is the least a company can do.
Giving decent hours is another.
Being aware of people who are neurodiverse and making the appropriate changes to your hiring practices would be the best thing.
Actually people with disabilities are not under minimum pay requirements. You can pay them less than minimum wage. It is a loophole in Federal law that allows companies to issue waivers in order encourage their employment. Only three states require companies within their domain to pay the minimum wage regardless.
 

commiecorvus

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Actually people with disabilities are not under minimum pay requirements. You can pay them less than minimum wage. It is a loophole in Federal law that allows companies to issue waivers in order encourage their employment. Only three states require companies within their domain to pay the minimum wage regardless.

There are certain circumstances where you can do that, it's called supported employment.
It dates back to the days when rather than do real rehab they would stick people with disabilities in broom factories.
There are even companies that pay people with disabilities in gift cards.
It is a horrible, dated concept and fuck anyone who does it.
On the positive side
Federal contractors have to pay the federal minimum wage.
Alaska, California and two other states have made the practice illegal.
 
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Tessa120

I escaped the asylum!
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Actually people with disabilities are not under minimum pay requirements. You can pay them less than minimum wage. It is a loophole in Federal law that allows companies to issue waivers in order encourage their employment. Only three states require companies within their domain to pay the minimum wage regardless.
That would be like half of the US then. Except for what Commie said, people who are disabled get the same pay. Would you really want your employer paying you less because you wear glasses and justifying it because you are sight disabled?
 

Fix It

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Your title says PMT. Unless there's something special the PMT does that I missed, then you're the same as the rest of us. Simply doing routine upkeep in the home means learning hand and power tools, learning how to paint walls so they are pretty and the floor isn't painted, drywall patching and replacement, fixing electrical glitches or bad wiring in a way that would satisfy code (if they ever checked), same with plumbing, same with interior renovations such as removing or adding walls, same with concrete pouring and crack fixing, figuring out how to troubleshoot and fix motors in all sorts of appliances, etc. Probably 90% of the people here can do what you can simply because when the electrical outlet went bad they called an older relative and asked how to safely take the entire outlet out and put in a new one or how to properly fix a pipe that just busted and just kept adding to that knowledge every little home upkeep quibble.
Keep telling yourself that. Upkeep of a multimillion dollar 140,000 square foot asset and the hundreds of assets inside and outside of it isn’t as simple as asking Uncle Dave how to change an outlet. Repair is the easy part of our jobs most of the time. We’re a lot more involved in behind the scenes operations than you’d think. Sure there are awful PMTs out there who only fix stuff, and it’s glaringly obvious when you enter a store with someone like that.
 

Tessa120

I escaped the asylum!
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Okay, the job description is a little light on Target.com. What do you do that requires advanced schooling that can't be picked up in any other way?
 

NKG

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Okay, the job description is a little light on Target.com. What do you do that requires advanced schooling that can't be picked up in any other way?
Tell me how you learn electrical or plumbing without doing those jobs without apprenticeship?
 

Tessa120

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Electrical, I called my FIL who is an electrical engineer and is a firm believer in doing it yourself rather than paying someone. He talked me through wiring a brand new light, replacing an entire outlet that had gone bad, showed me how to run new outlets and new light and how they would hook into the breaker box. He also picked up plumbing from somewhere and talked me through some of that. My dad had to rewire the box that ran from the electric company's lines to the house lines to be up to code before the electric company would replace a broken wire.

I was good with numbers and budgeting a check book and had an office procedures course in high school so my new husband who worked in construction supply talked to his boss who talked to one of the subcontractors and I got a bookkeeping job. He wanted to get a class A contractor's license than he had, dragged me along to the course, and then about 20 minutes into the course he got a phone call and had to leave and told me to stay and take really good notes so I could brief him before the test. I regurgitated the information well enough that he got that license, so definitely picked up a lot of stuff about carpentry there. Add in that a couple of my husband's friends were framers, and they walked us all through the practical side when we were building stuff for sci fi/fantasy conventions. One also showed the ropes in repairing a leak in the roof of the house that we were at. Also part of that bookkeeping, I learned a lot of codes and where to find out how to meet them. My husband working in construction supply, he made sure I learned how to use power tools because he thought they were cool as shit. Oh, and everything we install in the house has to have heavy duty fasteners, so I had to learn how to properly use them.

Same FIL, he rode our asses hard to repair our own dryer and our own washer when they both broke. He also showed how he ripped out a fireplace and ran piping lines in its place for a water heater, and then capped that off and walked me through doing it, because we were seriously considering ripping out a cabinet and putting in a dishwasher and we would need to lay the lines in. Alas, the space sizing didn't work, but I got enough of the basics down and again, that framer bookkeeping job taught me where to go for information and who to talk to for help when that information falls short.

At this point in life, when family or friends need something fixed, fingers get pointed at me. It's been a few years since I was taking a saw to wood, but the memory is there, the math is most certainly still there, and how to find what I don't know and follow those directions is still there, and I love using hand tools.

Sure, I'm not a master electrician or master plumber. But the qualifications that I saw for PMT didn't call for either. I'm sure a lot of it is OJT, not a host of degrees and certifications before Target hires. I'm also sure that the pay rate for trained electricians and plumbers is far higher than what Target offers a PMT. Back in the day I felt that if I wanted to deal with miserable outdoor working conditions and some degree of harassment from construction workers of the male persuasion I could have done well in pursuing an electrician apprenticeship and the local shipyard was always hiring, but outdoor, yuck.

Knowledge and practice is not limited to formal schooling. A lot of knowledge comes from being creative with what education you do have and seeking opportunities to practice what you learn. I hate the teeny backwater village that I'm currently in as there are just no jobs in my field ever posted on job hiring sites within the radius I can commute, I hate that my husband was transferred to this teeny backwater village, and I hate that I had to leave a very nice job that paid incredibly well and had me on the track to working in the escrow department, which would have opened the doors to some really, really well paying bank jobs, that I got simply by taking an office procedures class in high school and applying it creatively later in life.
 
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I’m actually a prime example of someone who has the skills, the work ethic, and knowledge to have a better job in theory, but for precisely the reason Comiecorvus mentioned, am stuck at Target because interviews are such an obstacle even when I’ve practiced answers to common interview questions. I’ve been to college. So, yeah, I’m trying to better myself, but it takes more than just that to get into better job fields these days. Check yourself, people. (Not gonna call out by names because I don’t want to be banned.) When you’re filling in for virtually every non-managerial role in the store, beloved by regular guests, training most of your store’s team, and still not getting sufficient hours you can try to tell me that’s not worth $15/hour.

*mic drop*
 

can't touch this

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
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So I’m wondering...lately our leadership has been making these lofty claims that once E2E returns and we start owning our own areas, we’ll be getting 40 or close to it with 8 hours per day minimum. 🤔 🤔 🤔 🤔 🤔 🤔. Just curious if anybody else’s leaders are saying this?

I guess my question is, WHY would they be telling us this, are they getting disinfo from our DTL? Not in a huddle by the way, but it keeps coming up in random conversations about hours and they’re pretty up front about it. It goes without saying that getting “close to” 40 hours a week at 15 an hour at fucking Target of all places is less believable than Kent Hovind. I’ll believe it when I see it (which is never).
 

PJ5

Joined
Jan 8, 2015
Messages
181
Employees and hours are cut short at places that pay min wage as well, Target just has more of an “excuse” at $15. Almost all businesses don’t want to spend money if they don’t have to on anything, even if it makes the quality of business go down. It’s terrible that corporations just don’t care or comprehend with the current cost of living that their employees who make it possible for their stores to bring in revenue need money to survive.
 
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