15 dolla make u holla (in despair)

Aredhel

Jolly Rancher
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
789
Hey guess what? Automation, machines and robots are coming to replace you either way but the $15 narrative push is just going to expedite the process. Your understanding of economics is petulant and highly ignorant at best.

You don’t deserve $15 an hour to sell toilet paper and toothpaste. I’m sorry that your parents and schools and the media have failed you but that’s the truth.

If you ever for one second believed that companies were just going to raise their base pay to $15 an hour and just take it on the chin, your naivety is out of control. It seems like you just now figured out what the result of this wage increase was going to be. Gee, it only took you what? 2 years? lol.

I can sum up your entire problem in just one sentence: You don’t understand that life isn’t fair and that life doesn’t care the least about your feelings.
And I can sum up your entire problem is that you have to have people doing certain jobs and if you don’t give them enough time YOU will be taking up the slack and . you. won’t. like. it.
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2019
Messages
338
The good news is that I'm falling into a decent evening routine. The turnover is good for those of us remaining, I'm getting more hours than I have in months. Reshop, remaining push, more reshop, then auditing at the end.

I'm pretty much alone all day (regarding coworkers/managers, until breaktime anyway) unless I need help with something.
 

GozerZuul

FORMER fLOW tm. MOVED ONTO WALLY WORLD.
Joined
Mar 13, 2019
Messages
45
The frustrating thing about that is there are a lot of people especially people with disabilities who want full time jobs but who can only get jobs in places like Target.
They need to make a living but are under employed and not being paid jack.
They need that $15.00 an hour.
We have people who are high functioning autism, who have gone to college but can't get past the interview stage and wind up with jobs well below what they have the skills for.
The unemployment rate for people with autism and a college education is 80%, so the idea of 'bettering yourself to move up is just mouth music.
And of those who are employed at least half are underemployed.

Paying a living wage is the least a company can do.
Giving decent hours is another.
Being aware of people who are neurodiverse and making the appropriate changes to your hiring practices would be the best thing.
truth man, truth. i have aspergers which is considered "high functioning" but isnt really. interviews are the worst. from what i seen, working construction jobs, warehouse, and recently another retail job at a blue competitor-target is actually the worst for neurodivergent people. too much pressure and then the ADA and even FMLA is hooped all to hell.also the 80% is only those looking for work, many of our band tend to give up after a few years and either aim for government assistance or just "reside to their fate" and get under someone's care-whether they help them or not is a issue.
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2019
Messages
338
target is actually the worst for neurodivergent people.
That's why I'm so glad I'm basically by myself all night. I just know I'd say something wrong in front of a coworker eventually. I'm at my worst when I have no formula to abide by in conversation (guests are relatively easy to deal with because of that)--unless you're interested in my hobbies. Then I can talk your ear off.

Not sure what's wrong with me, but I sure as hell ain't normal.

I just assume I'm doing fine unless someone says something to me.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2019
Messages
22
truth man, truth. i have aspergers which is considered "high functioning" but isnt really. interviews are the worst. from what i seen, working construction jobs, warehouse, and recently another retail job at a blue competitor-target is actually the worst for neurodivergent people. too much pressure and then the ADA and even FMLA is hooped all to hell.also the 80% is only those looking for work, many of our band tend to give up after a few years and either aim for government assistance or just "reside to their fate" and get under someone's care-whether they help them or not is a issue.
That's why I'm so glad I'm basically by myself all night. I just know I'd say something wrong in front of a coworker eventually. I'm at my worst when I have no formula to abide by in conversation (guests are relatively easy to deal with because of that)--unless you're interested in my hobbies. Then I can talk your ear off.

Not sure what's wrong with me, but I sure as hell ain't normal.

I just assume I'm doing fine unless someone says something to me.
Same. I am believed to have asperger's (haven't had insurance or the ability to afford all the different types of doctors and referrals and specialists visits that are required in my state before you can be seen by the right type of doctor to 100% confirm it) but my primary care doctor is positive that I am.

I suck at interviews. I get off on tangents and then don't remember the original point I was trying to make. I'm actually surprised that I got a TL position at Target because so much is based on the interview process. The only thing I think that saved me is I had a good work history and had someone that believed that I had the capability to do the job, even if I kept bombing the interviews, because they had seen me work and complete tasks as they were given.
 

Aredhel

Jolly Rancher
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
789
truth man, truth. i have aspergers which is considered "high functioning" but isnt really. interviews are the worst. from what i seen, working construction jobs, warehouse, and recently another retail job at a blue competitor-target is actually the worst for neurodivergent people. too much pressure and then the ADA and even FMLA is hooped all to hell.also the 80% is only those looking for work, many of our band tend to give up after a few years and either aim for government assistance or just "reside to their fate" and get under someone's care-whether they help them or not is a issue.
Neurodivergent. The best description I’ve heard.
 

Tessa120

I escaped the asylum!
Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Messages
2,578
Blech. Feeding problems at birth for several weeks, refusing to feed if being touched (which a developmental pediatrician said was common in children later diagnosed with autism). Months old, if anyone tried to interact, turn face away. Very rarely make baby noises and very few letter sounds. Human touch leads to screaming. Seams in clothes causes screaming. Certain sounds, same. Toddler, never responds to name. Can't turn anything into a toy, it's just all lined up the exact same way every time, screaming if it's disrupted. Potty trained at five, saying one or two words a day at five. Sign language and augmentative devices an utter fail because the speech problems are tied to socialization, not a desire to communicate without the ability.

I'd love to know when they diverged from normal and how all that and more is just being different, not impaired. I dont get how people with autism can look at their past, how they can look at how very much they were locked in their own world to the point they couldn't feed themselves or go to the bathroom in the toilet rather than their pants, how they couldn't use the words to ask for help, and say that was an acceptable alternative way to live. How clothes, carpets, peanut butter, and birds singing was so much pain they'd scream out was a decent way to feel the world around them.

Even as adults there's significant impairment, even if it's not easily seen. Just because there's an adult ability to reason and mask doesn't mean there's no impact to daily life, and it doesn't start off in life as mild, there's a really deep well to climb up to get to it's not obvious.

I dont see how anyone could claim all that as different, or diverged from normal in utero.
 

checklane01

*smashes call box*
Joined
Nov 5, 2018
Messages
34
$15 an hour will be invoked heavily by leadership as the go-to response for everything.
This has already happened. My ETL commended us on the best BRLA in the district. Then continued to say the DTL (or whatever they’re called now) is telling stores since we’re paying more, there needs to be higher expectations.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 2, 2019
Messages
22
Blech. Feeding problems at birth for several weeks, refusing to feed if being touched (which a developmental pediatrician said was common in children later diagnosed with autism). Months old, if anyone tried to interact, turn face away. Very rarely make baby noises and very few letter sounds. Human touch leads to screaming. Seams in clothes causes screaming. Certain sounds, same. Toddler, never responds to name. Can't turn anything into a toy, it's just all lined up the exact same way every time, screaming if it's disrupted. Potty trained at five, saying one or two words a day at five. Sign language and augmentative devices an utter fail because the speech problems are tied to socialization, not a desire to communicate without the ability.

I'd love to know when they diverged from normal and how all that and more is just being different, not impaired. I dont get how people with autism can look at their past, how they can look at how very much they were locked in their own world to the point they couldn't feed themselves or go to the bathroom in the toilet rather than their pants, how they couldn't use the words to ask for help, and say that was an acceptable alternative way to live. How clothes, carpets, peanut butter, and birds singing was so much pain they'd scream out was a decent way to feel the world around them.

Even as adults there's significant impairment, even if it's not easily seen. Just because there's an adult ability to reason and mask doesn't mean there's no impact to daily life, and it doesn't start off in life as mild, there's a really deep well to climb up to get to it's not obvious.

I dont see how anyone could claim all that as different, or diverged from normal in utero.
I mean, a lot of the stuff you are talking about is the very high end of the spectrum. And some of that behavior isn't exclusive to autistic people. I have a friend who didn't talk until she was 5. She was tested and not on the spectrum. She now has kids and one of them is taking after her, not talking. She's also been tested and isn't on it.

That being said, if someone does have some of those behaviors and is on the high end or even middle area of the spectrum, their brains work differently. They may not look at their pasts the same. Or at all. I've never known anyone on the high end personally, but I know 2 or 3 that are closer to middle than low end, and quite a few with what used to be referred to as aspergers.

As I said above for myself, it is believed that I fall into the aspergers category and hope to have it officially confirmed or denied whenever I can get doctors visits lined up with days off. But I have issues with daily life things, but am still a functional member of society. I suck at interviews. I cannot do eye contact very well. Socks sometimes don't go on the right way, have to take them off and start over or get a new pair. But growing up in the south, manners were a big thing, so that meant eye contact and many other things I am/was unable to do. So, I learned to mask issues or find ways to mimic behaviors without doing the behavior.

My SO finally noticed after 12 years together that I don't look them directly in the eye or if I do, it is briefly. Once they caught on they started noticing my minute eye movements and so now sometimes while we are talking they will ask what part of their face I am looking at. Usually it is an eyebrow, or rim of their glasses, sometimes to of nose or bridge of nose. Learned at a young age when being told to look people in the eye that the above generally worked when i otherwise couldn't look them in the eye. They asked recently why I never told them about any of the above and I simply said because I don't have a concrete answer yet. But it is obvious that our minds don't work the same way either.

This has already happened. My ETL commended us on the best BRLA in the district. Then continued to say the DTL (or whatever they’re called now) is telling stores since we’re paying more, there needs to be higher expectations.
This has happened to us as well. "We are paying more so you have more responsibilities now.
 
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