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I'm Lost! Bike Assembly

Joined
Feb 11, 2012
Messages
13
Hi everyone,

Does anyone on this forum do Bike Assembly for their store?

I've been with Target for a year now, and my ETL-HR came up to me the other day and asked if I would like to do bikes for the store. She mentioned I would be perfect for it. So I said why not, lol.

Anyways, Im schedule to be trained tommorrow at another store and was wondering what bike assembly is like and if there is at all a pay increase?

She mentioned that I'll be schedule for Bikes 1 day out of the week.. how long are the bike assembly shifts?

Any other information about this position would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks //cartguy
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
4
I am the 2nd person in my store that was trained for bikes. Between me and the other guy we get like 1 shift every other week that's about 8 hours long. I still get paid the same. I like it though, all alone in the back room where I can use my phone and listen to music. The LOD's and ETL's even come to chat with me when they get bored or irritated.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2012
Messages
78
We have two people trained in my store to build bikes right smack-dab in the middle of my signing area. They build once about once a week. Sometimes every couple of weeks. I guess it would depend on the volume of your store. I'm ultra low volume so there isn't much of a need to build so often.
 

Parker51

Senior Team Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
94
Hi everyone,

Does anyone on this forum do Bike Assembly for their store?

I've been with Target for a year now, and my ETL-HR came up to me the other day and asked if I would like to do bikes for the store. She mentioned I would be perfect for it. So I said why not, lol.

Anyways, Im schedule to be trained tommorrow at another store and was wondering what bike assembly is like and if there is at all a pay increase?

She mentioned that I'll be schedule for Bikes 1 day out of the week.. how long are the bike assembly shifts?

Any other information about this position would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks //cartguy
I am the Bike Builder at my store, which is low-volume, but has above-average bike sales for its size. I got the full $1 differential for my market (promotion to PG7), whether bike building or performing other duties. When I'm not bike building (about 1-2 days a week depending on the season, and how many bikes come in), I'm usually on the sales floor. I spend about 80% of my bike builder hours assembling, 10% repairing/ordering parts, and 10% merchandizing and interacting with guests to sell them bikes. I seldom have to build more than a half-dozen bikes at a time, so usually don't spend more than a half-shift on bike builder duties. I have a backup builder at the store who is really only required a couple of times a year, such as during the summer or before Christmas.

I already had some experience, so only needed the printed assembly manual and the safety checklist. Some have seen the video, or have had the opportunity to have an experienced builder from another store train them. I trained myself, then trained several others at local stores. Having ridden a bicycle, and knowing how it's suppose to look and feel, helps, but is not necessary if you have good training. If you want to learn more about bike maintenance out of personal interest (not that I would suggest that you work off the clock), check out the Sheldon Brown website:

http://www.sheldonbrown.com

The provided Park-brand tools are great, but see if you can get the store to buy you a spoke wrench to do minor wheel truing. During a previous fourth quarter, where there wasn't time to order a new wheel for a Christmas gift, but some simple spoke tightening could safely straighten the existing wheel, I convinced my management to reimburse me for one out of petty cash and put it in the toolbox.

I'd recommend ordering your own parts, via the provided order forms sent to the FAX numbers for Pacific and Dynacraft. After doing this for a while, I am lightly supervised, and encouraged to merchandise the bike and accessory displays, stow assembled bicycles, replenish stock from the back room, print signing, compact the shipping boxes in the baler, screen incoming repairs at the service desk, and FAX in my own parts orders whenever I am in the store working. This also helps with the expected task of re-checking bicycles periodically on the sales floor, and if possible at the point-of-sale, for flat tires, loose bolts, missing parts, etc.

You will probably be expected to get your assembly speed down to about 20-25 minutes a bike on average. Usually this means about 15 minutes for a child's bike with no gears and coaster brake, and up to 45 minutes for complex gearing and brakes on mountain and stunt bikes. Concentrate on working safely and accurately at first, then gradually build up your assembly speed. The bikes mostly come pre-assembled, but some adjustments of brakes and gears are necessary. Take this seriously, because a bike can be inherently dangerous if not properly adjusted. Our blue competition is at least indirectly responsible for the deaths of a few children.

Good luck with your promotion!
 
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