Diversity Equity & Inclusion

Joined
Jan 5, 2020
Messages
202
I’ve been reading about Target’s corporate message about diversity inclusion and equity and I have noticed some changes in the store like photos of the founders of Black-owned businesses near their products. It’s all well and good to hear corporate say they’re going to increase the diversity among the leaders including people of color, people who are lgbtqia, differently abled people (Is this okay to say? If not, I am sorry.). Has anyone seen any kind of initiatives in their stores for team members (besides the diversity T-shirt)? The fact that my store hasn’t done anything doesn’t surprise me but I was wondering if other team members were getting training or anything like that.
 
Joined
May 8, 2020
Messages
107
I feel like it shouldn’t take “training” to have a kind soul and welcome others. But I guess that’s where we’re at. The first step is not just telling, but SHOWING the people you described that they are welcome at Target. My store has hired either 4 or 5 people with a severe level of autism in the past year and one person with, for lack of understanding what they actually suffer from, a very very severe congenital disorder.
 

oath2order

Scary Socialist
Joined
Oct 24, 2013
Messages
9,944
I’ve been reading about Target’s corporate message about diversity inclusion and equity and I have noticed some changes in the store like photos of the founders of Black-owned businesses near their products. It’s all well and good to hear corporate say they’re going to increase the diversity among the leaders including people of color, people who are lgbtqia, differently abled people (Is this okay to say? If not, I am sorry.). Has anyone seen any kind of initiatives in their stores for team members (besides the diversity T-shirt)? The fact that my store hasn’t done anything doesn’t surprise me but I was wondering if other team members were getting training or anything like that.
You're still allowed to say disabled, AFAIK.

What sort of training are you thinking.
 
Joined
Sep 25, 2019
Messages
1,064
Years ago at the F500 we had to go through a full day of diversity training. Our staff was a potpourri of everything, you name it we had them. Religion, preferences, ethnicities, colors, countries of origin. Everyone got along fine, we never heard of any issues. The course was boring but they did spring for a very nice buffet lunch.
 

happygoth

reshop till I drop
Joined
Apr 17, 2019
Messages
2,866
My store is very diverse. Straight white TMs are in the minority, and I've only just thought about that now because of the topic at hand.

I think Target does a pretty good job at promoting diversity. The Black History Month and Pride merchandise, the promoting and support of Black-owned businesses, and the general hiring practices are very inclusive. We have TLs that are LGBTQ+ and POC. I'm not sure what else they can do publicly.
 
Last edited:

TLSpot

Keeper of the Beans
Joined
Dec 19, 2019
Messages
50
I’ve held trainings with my team on different topics in this realm and make sure to get feedback from them, but it’s not anything official. Same with my peers. I’m on the spectrum and my peers are supportive and willing to learn. Not sure if it’s such a big thing in other stores.
 
Last edited:

commiecorvus

Former Signing Ninja
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 10, 2011
Messages
18,064
People first language is your best bet when it comes to talking about people with disabilities.
You say someone who is neurodiverse or a person who is on the spectrum.
Not, they are autistic.
Nobody is their condition.
I have epilepsy.
I'm not an epileptic.
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2021
Messages
117
Nobody is their condition.
I have epilepsy.
I'm not an epileptic.
I slip up on this sometimes. Good to keep in mind.


Our store has people with a variety of difficult limitations, but we've been able to make it work without much trouble. It makes me feel proud to integrate the different abilities of people, and I think it's very good for team cohesion.
 

TLSpot

Keeper of the Beans
Joined
Dec 19, 2019
Messages
50
I do want to add, yes, person first is preferred, but also don’t be afraid to ask. I am autistic, and prefer that, but say I’m on the spectrum a majority of the time because most people are uncomfortable about it and correct me. I can’t exactly separate my autism from my identity because it affects so much of how I respond to things and how I think. Depends on the person. Somewhat similarly, being Deaf is different than being HoH or having severe hearing loss. Person first is a good default for most situations, but those two can have some exceptions.
 
Joined
Jan 5, 2020
Messages
202
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
It sounds like you all have diverse stores at a TM level and you have leaders who know how to handle incidents with guests who say racist, homophobic, misogynistic, or ableist things to TMs. It sounds like your leaders not only know how to handle the guest but they probably also recognize that being Asian and having a guest say they didn’t want you touching their stuff because of COVID is racist as fuck and when a 20 year bursts into tears maybe don’t prioritize fucking break cards instead of talking to her.
You what, nevermind, corporate mandated diversity training probably wouldn’t help.
 

commiecorvus

Former Signing Ninja
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 10, 2011
Messages
18,064
I do want to add, yes, person first is preferred, but also don’t be afraid to ask. I am autistic, and prefer that, but say I’m on the spectrum a majority of the time because most people are uncomfortable about it and correct me. I can’t exactly separate my autism from my identity because it affects so much of how I respond to things and how I think. Depends on the person. Somewhat similarly, being Deaf is different than being HoH or having severe hearing loss. Person first is a good default for most situations, but those two can have some exceptions.

I never correct the people with the disabilities on how they want to be called.
Deaf folks are a really good example, like you said.
The Deaf (Big D) Community is very strong and have no problem being called Deaf.
I have a friend who spends most of his life in a wheelchair.
He insists we call him The Gimp.
I sure as hell wouldn't do that to anyone else in a wheelchair but for him, kewl, kewl.
As always, if you aren't sure, ask.
Folks don't take it personally.
In fact most will be glad you did.
 

happygoth

reshop till I drop
Joined
Apr 17, 2019
Messages
2,866
It sounds like you all have diverse stores at a TM level and you have leaders who know how to handle incidents with guests who say racist, homophobic, misogynistic, or ableist things to TMs. It sounds like your leaders not only know how to handle the guest but they probably also recognize that being Asian and having a guest say they didn’t want you touching their stuff because of COVID is racist as fuck and when a 20 year bursts into tears maybe don’t prioritize fucking break cards instead of talking to her.
You what, nevermind, corporate mandated diversity training probably wouldn’t help.
Omg now that is just fucked up. That happened at your store? Yeah, I'd say that leader needs some training alright, not just diversity training but how to be a compassionate and understanding person. Holy crap.
 
Joined
Mar 9, 2019
Messages
253
I noticed our store in the past year is hiring people that stand out. Like bullring in their nose, rainbow hair, spiked Mohawk, guys with makeup or boobs. We have a person that I’m guessing was born a man but has a full beard and mustache and boobs. We have black trivia bingo and a Michelle Obama book in the break room. In the store we have an entire section dedicated to black history month.
 

Ringwraith917

Professional Badass
Joined
Jan 21, 2014
Messages
1,615
if the diversity of the store matches the diversity of the community, then the job is done. "Put straight white males in the minority" is not diversity. Js.
I know that wasn't the point of the OP. Just putting my two cents in
 

DBZ

Joined
Dec 9, 2018
Messages
781
Our store mostly matches the community, although this year, it seems that Target has been hiring people who stand out more (mostly as seasonals). How long has Target been doing something for Black History Month?
 
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
1,814
Our store is at least 75% more diverse than the community in which it is located. I really think that this diversity has helped to promote a welcome climate, though, as we have many guests from our more diverse surrounding communities. It doesn't hurt that we have a rep for being a really clean, well-stocked store with friendly, knowledgeable, and helpful team members. Guests come to our store even though there are Targets closer to their home.
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2017
Messages
922
Our store is very diverse. Target does a very progressive job of diversity and inclusion. The only company I've worked for that didn't just talk about it but live it.
if the diversity of the store matches the diversity of the community, then the job is done. "Put straight white males in the minority" is not diversity. Js.
I know that wasn't the point of the OP. Just putting my two cents in
There are fewer white men than white women in the country. Yet white men are, by far, the highest represented demographic by almost any standard.
 
Top