Electronics TM

commiecorvus

Former Signing Ninja
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This will be my first job actually, I know a lot about tech but I also know that it only aids in a portion of the overall responsibilities of the job. How is it for you guys in Electronics? How are the hours?

I actually applied for Specialty Sales with the same store last month and got rejected within a few hours (all on a Sunday), presumably because I was still in school so that meant terrible availability. This month I am a graduating senior so the school year ended early for us.

I applied to GM on 5/23 with better availability and got the virtual interview in two hours. I completed it the same day and heard back on 5/27, where HR asked about my plans since I'm out of HS now.

On 5/28, I was called with a verbal job offer to be a Tech Consultant and not GM, they reinstated my application for Specialty Sales and I received the offer letter today (5/29) officially.

Seems like the background check passed within an hour with the "Your Target pre-employment screening is complete" email unless it means something else.

But overall, I am fairly satisfied because I enjoy tech and wasn't expecting the position to be offered since I already got rejected, technically. Now, I'm just waiting for a call regarding orientation.

FYI, I do have CompTIA's A+, Network+, and Security+ certs but I'm not sure whether or not this impacted my application. I also had 9 months of experience training and learning within tech, which is how I was able to get those certs. Practically, I've been dealing with tech for around 5 years.
Welcome! My ETL requires that anybody working Electronics is "qualified" so it more than likely had some away. However not all stores are the same! We have an electronics megathread here where you can find all kinds of fun little tidbits and other helpful information, but really it's all retail in the end.
 

60SecondsRemaining

Former SrTL - Replen
Joined
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Messages
660
With a CompTIA stack, especially a sec+ why are you applying to Target?

You can easily get a job with better hours that pays double working desktop support or as a junior security analyst.
 
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Personal opinion, and perhaps a hot take ...you could be an annoying fit. My best advice? Stay humble. To tech at target, your certs are useless and if you flaunt said knowledge as a child to your veteran team members you will find yourself alienated just for being a know-it-all. Target tech is primarily about being able to stay on target as it were, accomplishing all of your work while maintaining guest happiness. I can tell you now that nice old lady doesn't give two shits what the processor in the laptop means, it's cool that you may know, but stick to the basics and tailor your conversations to the guest you are with. This is retail in the end, and any idiot with google can find any information in tech in moments.

As they said above, you are over qualified for this job, but if you want to keep it cause the money is decent for how easy it is, just remember all those qualifications are useless.

I say this as someone who trains 6-7 new Tech tms every year for the last decade, and I get a few every year in this situation who don't work out because they think tech has anything to do with....well tech
 
Joined
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Honestly? Yea.

This is all about the soft skills and using your knowledge to figure out what the guest needs.
This is a litteral convo I had tonight.
"Hi uhhh I wanna make my phone work on my tv"

So you may think the option is cast it to the tv! It's simple!
So you tell that to your guest.

"No that's too complicated. "

I saw my friend do it at a party and they connected it with a wire.

"OK so do you have a iPhone or android?"

"Neither I have a LG"

"Could I see what the port on your phone looks like?"

*guest shows phone for a second looks at you annoyed*

"Ok so looks like you have a usb c port, *shows charger * does your charging wire look like this?"

"Yes"

Ok so follow me this way I have just the item. *usb c to hdmi adpater*

"So you plug this end into your phone. And then plug your hdmi wire into this end. And the other side to the tv"

"Ok you sure this will work?"

"Positive! , your totally is 34.69 ."

"Thanks for shopping at target , if you could take the survey right here I'd appreciate it"


The hardest part you'll find is proving your right without making your guest feel like a idiot. So you don't wanna hold your knowledge above them.
 
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Joined
May 29, 2021
Messages
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  • #9
With a CompTIA stack, especially a sec+ why are you applying to Target?

You can easily get a job with better hours that pays double working desktop support or as a junior security analyst
The only reason I applied to Target Tech is because I wanted a job over the summer that is within walking distance, pays more than minimum wage, and is “roughly” remotely related to tech. My store checked all of the boxes. I also just wanted to get out of the house.

I am a graduating senior who is transitioning into college where I will pursue a degree in cybersecurity, and I intend on leaving Target in late August.

I just listen to my trainers, keep a low profile, and do my work, but honestly, I couldn’t tell guests the difference between any of the smart home products that we sell— I just don’t care to research. If I’m not interested in the product myself, say AirPods, TV’s, iPhones, etc. then I just won’t know.

I want to be a cybersecurity analyst, not a salesperson/stocker/cashier.
 
Joined
May 29, 2021
Messages
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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Personal opinion, and perhaps a hot take ...you could be an annoying fit. My best advice? Stay humble. To tech at target, your certs are useless and if you flaunt said knowledge as a child to your veteran team members you will find yourself alienated just for being a know-it-all. Target tech is primarily about being able to stay on target as it were, accomplishing all of your work while maintaining guest happiness. I can tell you now that nice old lady doesn't give two shits what the processor in the laptop means, it's cool that you may know, but stick to the basics and tailor your conversations to the guest you are with. This is retail in the end, and any idiot with google can find any information in tech in moments.

As they said above, you are over qualified for this job, but if you want to keep it cause the money is decent for how easy it is, just remember all those qualifications are useless.

I say this as someone who trains 6-7 new Tech tms every year for the last decade, and I get a few every year in this situation who don't work out because they think tech has anything to do with....well tech
Yeah. I already knew those certs were useless for Target since it’s mostly just retail op. I didn’t know shit. One for ones, reshop, working the register, sorting and pushing truck, changing prices, etc. I absolutely did not know shit and it bugged me for the first week. I’m just now getting the hang of everything but I’m not sure if I’ll be efficient by the time I leave. It’s definitely not for me because I hate dealing with the general public. I’m more tested on product knowledge, but I don’t know about every product (or care about every product).

You’re absolutely correct though, I would look retarded trying to flex my knowledge about tech when retail op is what really needs to be known. My ETL probably couldn’t tell me what a PCIe slot is, but I can’t explain to them what a planogram is, honestly. But it’s Target, so who cares about a motherboard? My store doesn’t even sell graphics cards.

Keeping it straight, I’m not entirely sure why I landed the job since anybody who’s been working in retail could do it better. The most you’ll have to train a veteran for may be product knowledge on popular/common items.

As an aside, I was scheduled for 40 hours since we’re understaffed, but I wonder how it’ll be once that’s fixed.
 
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Messages
31,568
Keep on taking the hours.
Here is the definition of planogram at spot.
A planogram, sometimes shortened to plano or POG, is a set of instructions for how an aisle or endcap is supposed to be set up. This includes a bill of materials that describes how many and what type of fixtures, backer paper, and signing is supposed to be used. It also includes schematics and blueprints to show how to line up the various fixtures.
 
Last edited:
Joined
May 29, 2021
Messages
6
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
Honestly? Yea.

This is all about the soft skills and using your knowledge to figure out what the guest needs.
This is a litteral convo I had tonight.
"Hi uhhh I wanna make my phone work on my tv"

So you may think the option is cast it to the tv! It's simple!
So you tell that to your guest.

"No that's too complicated. "

I saw my friend do it at a party and they connected it with a wire.

"OK so do you have a iPhone or android?"

"Neither I have a LG"

"Could I see what the port on your phone looks like?"

*guest shows phone for a second looks at you annoyed*

"Ok so looks like you have a usb c port, *shows charger * does your charging wire look like this?"

"Yes"

Ok so follow me this way I have just the item. *usb c to hdmi adpater*

"So you plug this end into your phone. And then plug your hdmi wire into this end. And the other side to the tv"

"Ok you sure this will work?"

"Positive! , your totally is 34.69 ."

"Thanks for shopping at target , if you could take the survey right here I'd appreciate it"


The hardest part you'll find is proving your right without making your guest feel like a idiot. So you don't wanna hold your knowledge above them.
Fact. I grabbed around 10-15 AirPods from the back room and it makes me sad ringing people up for gen 2’s knowing that the gen 3’s are due in a few months. Plus it seems like they only last a year and a half before they begin to have random issues/terrible battery life. Then the pros have those silicon tips.. those are horrible.
 
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
1,886
Truth is, I wouldn't want someone with no interest in being a salesperson/cashier working in the tech department. I'd be more interested in someone that while understanding the tech could talk to the guests patiently in the most simple terms, set a pog quickly, accurately, and with a feel for necessary flexibility, could add a protection plan to a surge protector with a straight face, accessorize every sale, be able to save the sale by knowing what's available online, and make the guests want to see them every time they come into the store. Sounds to me that a job in AP might have been a better choice for you.
 

60SecondsRemaining

Former SrTL - Replen
Joined
Mar 21, 2014
Messages
660
The only reason I applied to Target Tech is because I wanted a job over the summer that is within walking distance, pays more than minimum wage, and is “roughly” remotely related to tech. My store checked all of the boxes. I also just wanted to get out of the house.

I am a graduating senior who is transitioning into college where I will pursue a degree in cybersecurity, and I intend on leaving Target in late August.

I just listen to my trainers, keep a low profile, and do my work, but honestly, I couldn’t tell guests the difference between any of the smart home products that we sell— I just don’t care to research. If I’m not interested in the product myself, say AirPods, TV’s, iPhones, etc. then I just won’t know.

I want to be a cybersecurity analyst, not a salesperson/stocker/cashier.

I was a Cyber Analyst before the role I have right now (Scrum Master for a Cyber aligned team).

Do not wait. Your career path requires a CISSP and soon, a CAP certification - these require experience to obtain. ISC2 will vet your background to ensure you have the requisite years of experience, until those are satisfied, you will not be able to obtain these certifications, just a junior version of them. The sooner you can find a job in that industry that you can spin into experience, the better.
 
Joined
May 29, 2021
Messages
6
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
Truth is, I wouldn't want someone with no interest in being a salesperson/cashier working in the tech department. I'd be more interested in someone that while understanding the tech could talk to the guests patiently in the most simple terms, set a pog quickly, accurately, and with a feel for necessary flexibility, could add a protection plan to a surge protector with a straight face, accessorize every sale, be able to save the sale by knowing what's available online, and make the guests want to see them every time they come into the store. Sounds to me that a job in AP might have been a better choice for you.
Well, I get to be their grunt boy until August and I get money out of an easy and convenient job. Win/win. No positions in AP were available.

It’s not really a permanent thing and I think that’s good for everyone.
 
Joined
May 29, 2021
Messages
6
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #16
I was a Cyber Analyst before the role I have right now (Scrum Master for a Cyber aligned team).

Do not wait. Your career path requires a CISSP and soon, a CAP certification - these require experience to obtain. ISC2 will vet your background to ensure you have the requisite years of experience, until those are satisfied, you will not be able to obtain these certifications, just a junior version of them. The sooner you can find a job in that industry that you can spin into experience, the better.

I was looking to have higher-level certifications, some intern experience, and the degree to be a step ahead.
 
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