Fresh Baby ETL

Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Messages
1
I’ve recently been promoted to ETL after working my way up from seasonal (hired a few years back) and I gotta say - having worked on the sales floor and directly with guests and bad leaders myself I worry about being overconfident in my relatability as I haven’t been in a TM role in a hot minute. Any TMs have some advice on how to be a good boss? I do my best to listen to my team and trust but I want to make sure it’s felt. Don’t want to be known as a Starbucks ETL. 🥺
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2015
Messages
425
I’ve recently been promoted to ETL after working my way up from seasonal (hired a few years back) and I gotta say - having worked on the sales floor and directly with guests and bad leaders myself I worry about being overconfident in my relatability as I haven’t been in a TM role in a hot minute. Any TMs have some advice on how to be a good boss? I do my best to listen to my team and trust but I want to make sure it’s felt. Don’t want to be known as a Starbucks ETL. 🥺
- Be knowledgeable in your area
- plan ahead
- help out the team when it gets busy (setting, pushing etc. we appreciate this and we wont think your just an office person)
-dont micro manage, but at the same time see how were doing and keep on top of us
- be confident, smile
- be nice, but not too nice
 
Joined
Sep 25, 2017
Messages
712
Lead by example and be willing to do whatever you ask your TMs to do - don't think of yourself as too good to do something you expect your team to do.
Listen to what your TMs say, even if they're off base. Feeling heard can be a big deal. (It'd be worth your time to learn some good listening techniques. Most people know plenty about how to talk; few know much about how to really listen.)
Don't engage in gossip, either with your TMs, about your TMs, or with higher-ups. It brings down everyone. If you need to vent, choose carefully who hears what you have to say.
Treat TMs equally and don't play favorites.
If you need to discipline a TM, do it privately. On the other hand, praise publicly.
Don't take credit for something one of your TMs does and own up to your own mistakes - stay humble.
 

Planosss

User friendly.
Joined
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Messages
2,956
Lead by example and be willing to do whatever you ask your TMs to do - don't think of yourself as too good to do something you expect your team to do.
Listen to what your TMs say, even if they're off base. Feeling heard can be a big deal. (It'd be worth your time to learn some good listening techniques. Most people know plenty about how to talk; few know much about how to really listen.)
Don't engage in gossip, either with your TMs, about your TMs, or with higher-ups. It brings down everyone. If you need to vent, choose carefully who hears what you have to say.
Treat TMs equally and don't play favorites.
If you need to discipline a TM, do it privately. On the other hand, praise publicly.
Don't take credit for something one of your TMs does and own up to your own mistakes - stay humble.
In other words, don’t be an effective ETL.
 

60SecondsRemaining

Former SrTL - Replen
Joined
Mar 21, 2014
Messages
495
Be transparent.

That's literally all it takes. You WILL need office time. You will need to plan, and that planning is important. Be transparent about that, show them what you do during your office time. Bring them in the office and show them what it's like to make a schedule or to plan a transition. You need a certain amount of time to plan and prepare, and by having that transparency they're going to respect that time far more than just "oh they're not here", because they'll actually know what it is you're doing. So instead of calling you 59 times, they'll seek ways to solve issues themselves in an effort to give you that respect.

On the other side, when you're not in the office, get out next to your team and work with them. You don't need to push product or set planners.

Any extra steps your team is taking reduces their efficiency. Find a way to remove those steps from them and incorporate them into your own routine as you're already walking around. For example, as I circled the floor during the flow process, I collected trash from my team and dropped it at the back. I also kept a stock of fresh blades on me for people who needed them. If I had a few extra minutes, I would open 15 or 20 cases on their flat so they wouldn't have to. It's small things that you do that fosters a sense of team but also drives efficiency by allowing your team to stay focused.
 

Fix It

ACT AS IF
Joined
Sep 16, 2017
Messages
830
You’ve been in the TMs shoes, you know the life. This question on this board is only going to yield negative comments.

Do what you’re asked, have realistic expectations, stand up for yourself and your team.

Good luck and congrats!
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2011
Messages
998
If your area is recognized by your superiors, you flow that shit downstream.
Your team has a ton of knowledge, don't discount it. If you succeed part of that will be because of the team.
Do NOT crawl up into the ivory tower and park your behind there. If something isn't working find out why. The worst thing a leader can say is simply "figure it out". "Why isn't this working?" is much better, there can be valid reasons and they may need input from their leader not put downs
Do not pick and play favorites- that will earn you zero respect
Set your expectations. Make sure they are the same for everyone, everyday. My very favorite STL had high expectations every single day. When we would get surprise visits, he never freaked out. His mantra was visit ready everyday. The guests deserve the same store as the regional and higher visitors. We never had to go around and make sure name tags were on, floors were tidy etc. It was expected.
Value your team. If you treat them as replaceable they will act accordingly. If they feel like they are a part of the success they will take ownership and shine.
If you do have a poor performer, do NOT under any circumstances discuss it downstream. That will take away any credibility you have instantly
Look and act professional. If you come strolling in late with bed head and wrinkled clothes your team will follow suit. If you got rip roaring drunk last night, don't brag about it or complain how tired you are because of it.
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2019
Messages
109
Don't try to micromanage about things you don't know about. I've had etls who had to ask me how to put backer up but still want to tell me what to do in a set. I know what I'm doing. What I need is someone who will let me do it.
 

Planosss

User friendly.
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2,956
Hey, fresh baby etl, focus/ remember your training if you want to keep your job. Listening to these socialist TBR members is gonna get you fired.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2019
Messages
275
Hey, fresh baby etl, focus/ remember your training if you want to keep your job. Listening to these socialist TBR members is gonna get you fired.
Not sure about getting fired, but the ETL role requires following management procedures taught in training and applying them daily. As for moi, socialista👻? Nyet, comrade....
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
Messages
5
As a professional, you should NOT be having to ask (that/those questions).
[ If you do ....then that position is not for you.
That said, join the club of those ETLs who are amply qualified to not be there ....till they are not Try to minimize the damage to a team in the meanwhile. - That is the unvarnished truth.
 

commiecorvus

Former Signing Ninja
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 10, 2011
Messages
17,072
I’ve recently been promoted to ETL after working my way up from seasonal (hired a few years back) and I gotta say - having worked on the sales floor and directly with guests and bad leaders myself I worry about being overconfident in my relatability as I haven’t been in a TM role in a hot minute. Any TMs have some advice on how to be a good boss? I do my best to listen to my team and trust but I want to make sure it’s felt. Don’t want to be known as a Starbucks ETL. 🥺

“The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”
― William Shakespeare


You are starting out in the right place with understanding that you don't know everything and that you have a lot to learn.
Being willing to admit you don't know everything and are willing to reach out is great.
This forum is a good place to start because dispite the overwhelming amount of snark, there is thousands of hours of expertise here as well as some very smart and talented people.

When I was working as a meatcutter the guy teaching me said that there are stages to knife work.
There is "I don't know what I'm doing, so I've got to be careful."
Next is, "I've got this, I know what I'm doing... And I just cut the tip of my finger off."
Then there is, "I don't cut myself very often but when I do it's messy."

And finally, "I barely ever cut myself but if it happen I can stop the blade as it slices into the top couple of levels of epidermis and not draw blood."

The thing is to get to that fourth level you have to be cutting meat for 20 years and you are still almost cutting yourself.
So you will still make mistakes no matter how good you get at this.
You will just be able to fix them before anyone notices.

Everyone you ever meet knows something you don't.
--Bill Nye


There are people working for you who you can learn from, take advantage of that.
Some of them come from amazing backgrounds, get to know them a little bit and don't make assumptions.
And for fucks sake don't talk down to people because they don't look, talk, have the same background, or education as you.
Most especially don't do it if they are people with disabilities.

I know all of that should go without saying, but I dealt with it from a number of ETLs at my old store and it drove me nuts.
There is nothing more annoying then having a women half your age consistently speak to you using the same vocal tones that mothers do with a three-year-old.
Even worse when she is doing it to a Korean War veteran and a former Grape Street Crip (he left for his kids, I didn't ask what it took to leave).
As I mentioned, get to know the people who are working for you. Some of these people have amazing lives and can add to your skills.

Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other. ― John F. Kennedy

Don't stop learning new stuff and don't just limit it to what the store management is willing to teach you.
Communication is not one of Spots strong suits and some of the management use information as a weapon.
Come here, Reddit, take Psych classes, read articles online, whatever you can do to get advance yourself and be a better boss.

But most important,

illegitimum non carborundum

Don't let the bastards grind you down.
When those above you start telling you to shit on your people and make their live miserable, do your best to keep that from happening.
You know your people best no some other asshole who doesn't work with them.
As long as you are pulling the best possible metrics, don't let them tell you how to do your job.

Good luck, you'll need it.
 
Last edited:

Black Sheep 214

Kiss no butts, give no fox
Joined
Apr 27, 2018
Messages
1,697
Congrats! Golden rule towards your team, do your best, and watch your back. Always. What commiecorvus says above is the best advice possible, especially this part:

Good luck, you'll need it.
Sorry to have to say it, but always keep your resume warm and keep looking to better yourself outside Spot. No matter how long you are there or how well you lead your team, a change in management can cost you your job, so have an escape plan ready just in case. I’ve seen some excellent ETLs get the boot, don’t let it happen to you. Good luck!
 
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