Archived Rate that correlate with the pay grades

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Jan 13, 2014
Messages
4
Hi all! I'm a newer ETL and I saw that someone posted the pay grade chart on here. However, what are the rates that go with those pay grades? Particularly interested in the ranges of the ETL and higher pay grades. Does anyone know?
 

Formina Sage

Probably still better than you at the stacker
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
1,810
I don't think anyone below STL/ETL-HR has access to that info, as it varies with your store's location.
 
Joined
May 29, 2012
Messages
7,385
There isn't really a good way to answer this. First, the base pay (what cashiers and salesfloor TMs start out at) varies from market to market and state to state. Even if every store were to start at minimum wage (hint: they don't), minimum wage varies from state to state.

Then, you are asking us to compare what are basically part-time hourly rates to your rate as a salaried, guaranteed paycheck person. Believe me, that is something most of us try not to dwell on. I've also noticed on here that there seems to be a bit of room for negotiation at that level that we don't have, so even the ETLs within the same district are likely making different amounts that can't be compared (which is why it is encouraged to not talk about pay rates and such).

Just know that what you make in a year as a new ETL would probably take me nearly 4 years to make as a GSA.
 

commiecorvus

Former Signing Ninja
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 10, 2011
Messages
18,052
Just know that what you make in a year as a new ETL would probably take me nearly 4 years to make as a GSA.

If not more.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2014
Messages
4
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
And I can appreciate yor frustration with that. I know team members make crap for money. It's why turnover is horrible and why people hate it there. My advice is to try for something more - a better company or going to school for a degree if you don't have one. That's the only way to fix that. There are team member that have been with target for 15 plus years and I'm like whhhyy???? Who can afford to live on what a team member gets paid? I mean I worked at Lowes and The Gap as a cashier and at least made $10/hr while I was putting myself through school. GSAs at Target don't even make $10/hr. I would never long term be able to live off of what a team member gets paid, let alone support my family. Target is very different for ETLs. I never once considered working for target at anything less than the ETL level and then that's why I waited until after I had my degree. Even as an ETL I would say they need to balance what they pay ETLs and TMs and start ETLs at less and TMs at more. Just my opinion....
 

commiecorvus

Former Signing Ninja
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 10, 2011
Messages
18,052
I appreciate your opinion and you're basically right but for many people, due to many factors (the local economy, scheduling conditions, childcare, etc.) they just don't have those options.

It would be great if Spot recognized the people they had for their skill and sterling qualities so they would promote from within but that doesn't happen (at least not to the ETL level).

Wishing you well and hoping that you turn out to be one of the good ones.
 
Last edited:

FrontEndFirecracker

Vibe Machine
Joined
Dec 25, 2011
Messages
135
This is true, but think about it logically. Hourly TMs and TLs get paid hourly for the job they do. Salaried ETL's and STL's get a fixed amount, no matter how much they work. My next door neighbor is the STL equivalent at a Super Walmart. He makes about $120,000 a year (plus bonuses for sales, etc.), but with the hours that he works, it breaks down to roughly $19-$20 an hour. Not worth it, IMO.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2013
Messages
2,272
This is true, but think about it logically. Hourly TMs and TLs get paid hourly for the job they do. Salaried ETL's and STL's get a fixed amount, no matter how much they work. My next door neighbor is the STL equivalent at a Super Walmart. He makes about $120,000 a year (plus bonuses for sales, etc.), but with the hours that he works, it breaks down to roughly $19-$20 an hour. Not worth it, IMO.

It would take an average of 115 hours per week (almost 17 hours a day, every day) @$20/hour to make $120,000 a year. He's not working as much as you think he is.


Most ETLs work 50-55 hours a week. Their standard scheduling is 10 hour shifts. Sometimes they stay an hour or 2 later, sometimes the opening LOD is out the door as soon as the closer shows up.
 

sigma7

Former ETL-All the Things
Joined
Jun 15, 2011
Messages
2,415
Consider that they work a five day work week with rotating weekends and whatnot. 115 hours per week is 23 hours per day. No way.
 

redeye58

Hasta Ba Rista, Baby!
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
19,900
I know team members make crap for money. It's why turnover is horrible and why people hate it there. My advice is to try for something more - a better company or going to school for a degree if you don't have one. That's the only way to fix that. There are team member that have been with target for 15 plus years and I'm like whhhyy???? Who can afford to live on what a team member gets paid? I mean I worked at Lowes and The Gap as a cashier and at least made $10/hr while I was putting myself through school. GSAs at Target don't even make $10/hr. I would never long term be able to live off of what a team member gets paid, let alone support my family...... Just my opinion....
And yet we manage despite the chump change spot gives for raises.
You'd be surprised how many of us have degrees but - for a myriad of reasons - we can't move up or out.
Many of us long-timers remember when Target was a good company to work for.
We also stay because we work with some really good people & starting over at the bottom someplace else isn't an option.
I'll respect your opinion a little more once you've made it through your first Q4 & you learn a little more about who makes up your team.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2013
Messages
98
Lets just face it the lower paid tms in the store are the ones that do all the work. This includes some team leads who actually support their teams. As far as ETLs they get paid the big bucks to sit down at TSC on their cellphones. It makes me really mad when there's no one on the floor and theyre in the office eating and talking for hours.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2014
Messages
4
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
I have actually been with target for about 10 months so I'm not that new, although I am newer. I guess I got lucky because I work with a great team, all of my TMs in my store like me and often go out of their way to visit the AP office to say hi. I know every single TMs name and what they do and make it a point to say hello to everyone who is working during my shift. I definitely don't work in a store where ETLs are sitting on their butts doing nothing. Our ETLs are there 12 hours a day, on the floor doing the work along side of team members. I am AP and do sales planners, set planos, pull flexible fulfillment orders, back up cashier, I know how to make Pizza Hut pizzas for crying out loud, all on top of keeping up with my AP work and the pressure that comes with all of the goals set by the powers that be. We are not allowed to sit at TSC for very long because it gives the wrong image to the team. Maybe I just have a good STL. It sucks that other ETLs are allowed to be that lazy, but in my store we definitely don't play that.
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2011
Messages
31,235
I have actually been with target for about 10 months so I'm not that new, although I am newer. I guess I got lucky because I work with a great team, all of my TMs in my store like me and often go out of their way to visit the AP office to say hi. I know every single TMs name and what they do and make it a point to say hello to everyone who is working during my shift. I definitely don't work in a store where ETLs are sitting on their butts doing nothing. Our ETLs are there 12 hours a day, on the floor doing the work along side of team members. I am AP and do sales planners, set planos, pull flexible fulfillment orders, back up cashier, I know how to make Pizza Hut pizzas for crying out loud, all on top of keeping up with my AP work and the pressure that comes with all of the goals set by the powers that be. We are not allowed to sit at TSC for very long because it gives the wrong image to the team. Maybe I just have a good STL. It sucks that other ETLs are allowed to be that lazy, but in my store we definitely don't play that.

Wow! Good job, lav! You have a good stl.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2014
Messages
4
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
I don't jump on the register, all though I did before I was assigned the ETL-AP here (I was also trained in this store and I know you aren't supposed to train in your store you are assigned in but that's what happened with me) -but I watch the front end so the GSA/GSTL can jump on the register when we need back up. Generally that's what the LOD will do as well. We actually call it backing up the front end (so we are still available if someone is at GS demanding to speak to a manager, etc) so I don't know why I typed back up cashier but that is what I meant. We make all the team leads jump on registers if needed, especially if sales floor TMs have been getting called for back up all day. But our STL actually does jump on the registers when needed. He is an awesome guy. I will say it is tough because with specialty work centers like AP and HR, I feel like the work we need to do gets pushed aside because our STLs expectation is extremely high when it comes to being present with the team on the actual sales floor and HR and AP are no exception. He has a mini huddle with just the ETLs so the LOD can assign us tasks for the day on the sales floor and while I get that presence is important, it's tough to balance his expectation with the job I need to do. And believe it or not, even with all of that, our team still complains a lot and still doesn't really give us the credit we deserve on the Best Team Survey, which only makes him lay the pressure on even more. I'm sure the pressure on him is heavier than it is on all te ETLs put together but the balance needs to be a little bit better.
 

mrknownothing

purveyor of things
Joined
Jun 10, 2011
Messages
10,148
I am AP and...back up cashier.

I like everything about your work, except this. I was under the impression that AP wasn't to work the registers. Shouldn't be letting the person who watches the people working with cash, then turn around and work with the cash. Separation of duties, checks and balances, etc.

Huh. Other than my recently departed GE, my ETL-AP is always the first ETL to respond to back-up. Most of the ETLs avoid the front end like the plague.
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2012
Messages
63
Most companies recognize talent / strong workers and try and keep them and at least give them a shot to advance through the ranks.

Requiring a degree for an ETL position is ridiculous. Forget the Logistics TM who knows it backwards and forwards, lets hire someone with a sociology degree instead who has never moved freight in their life. Sorry it makes no sense.
 
Joined
May 29, 2012
Messages
7,385
Large companies like Spot and its blue competitor don't want people who can think for themselves and know how to do the job. They want leaders who will do what they are told and follow by-the-book procedures without charting their own course. To do that, they have to hire leaders from outside the company who don't have enough knowledge of the ins and outs to do their own thing.
 

FlowMonkey

Former Team Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Messages
191
Most companies recognize talent / strong workers and try and keep them and at least give them a shot to advance through the ranks.

Requiring a degree for an ETL position is ridiculous. Forget the Logistics TM who knows it backwards and forwards, lets hire someone with a sociology degree instead who has never moved freight in their life. Sorry it makes no sense.

My old store had an ETL LOG with a degree in Agriculture, in the middle of a metropolitan area...
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2013
Messages
147
Most companies recognize talent / strong workers and try and keep them and at least give them a shot to advance through the ranks.

Requiring a degree for an ETL position is ridiculous. Forget the Logistics TM who knows it backwards and forwards, lets hire someone with a sociology degree instead who has never moved freight in their life. Sorry it makes no sense.

I completely disagree with what you said.... that requiring a degree for an ETL position is ridiculous.

What I think is ridiculous is allowing *any* degree. It would make sense to require business administration degrees, retail management degrees, law, etc. Not psychology or chemistry or anything else.

Why do I say this? Most TM's, while perfectly capable of leading the daily operations of the store, would eventually screw up when it comes to the legal/people factor. People with business admin degrees, law, etc specifically learn how to follow regulations that managers must inherently make sure are being followed. I know plenty of TM's who could manage damn near ever process at the store, but the problem is they don't have the knowledge to keep themselves (and the company) out of legal trouble. In other words, they are the type who would easily say/do something that opens the door wide open for TMs or guests to sue.

For example, we have one TM who knows every process in the store in and out. He can run circles around every ETL in the building. The other day we had an incident in which a guest slipped on a spill in chemicals and twisted her wrist. (and yes, it was legit our fault) The LOD at the time got some packaged ice out of the freezer in market, attempted to comfort her, etc. This TM and myself assisted. But what did this TM tell me on the side when we were walking away? "I would have told her if she wanted ice we were going to charge her for it".

And I thought to myself "And that's exactly why you aren't management material".

The fact is, a college educated person (particularly with a business degree) has been taught how stupid such a comment is... simply because it provokes the guest to take legal action. Many TM's simply don't think like that, and are likely to put their foot in their mouth without even realizing it. Management doesn't just lead, they also protect the company.

Furthermore, college educated people more often than not have better critical thinking skills, reading comprehension skills, responsibility, drive, etc than non-college educated people. Sorry, but that is simply the truth. It is backed up by countless statistics.

With that said, part of the problem (again) with Target is that they are not doing this correctly when recruiting ETLs.... they are recruiting ETLs who graduated from well known trash schools (i.e. "online" get your degree in 18 months kinds of deals) or graduated from legit schools, but barely made the GPA cut off to graduate. In other words, the lowest of the low of college grads.

Why? Most college grads didn't go to college to come out and work retail.... and the ones who graduated towards the top of their class have jobs in their majors. The ones who were at the bottom? They work retail management. Therefore, most of our ETLs who should exhibit these traits of college grads are overall incredibly flakey, simply because they are the bottom of the barrel college grads.

College grads who made it through state universities with honors or very high GPA's would absolutely destroy the kinds of college grads we have at Target. These ETL's are simply the bottom of the barrel. I can't tell you how many times I have heard ETL's make comments like "OMG I barely made it through college!" or "OMG I'm so glad my sorority had the answers for so many tests!". I've even heard ETL's sit around and brag to each other how they managed to get other people to write their papers in every class. These guys are clowns. End of story.
 
Joined
Aug 19, 2013
Messages
2,272
I completely disagree with what you said.... that requiring a degree for an ETL position is ridiculous.

What I think is ridiculous is allowing *any* degree. It would make sense to require business administration degrees, retail management degrees, law, etc. Not psychology or chemistry or anything else.

I think most of us wouldn't have near as much of a problem with the degree requirement if it meant something in business and having SOME amount of retail experience. Getting a kid with an art degree that has literally not worked a single day in his life (we had one once) spouting "Brand brand brand!" is what the TMs really hate.

I get what you're saying in the rest of your post but I would be curious to see what the difference in lawsuit payouts at the store level is between the time periods of "non college ETLs" and "mostly college ETLs". Spot has been requiring a degree long enough that they can look at that data.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top