Things That Made You Look Twice?

Tessa120

I escaped the asylum!
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The service animal thing needs to be explicitly defined by law (if it isn't already, idk) because you know some ass clown is going to bring their service rhinoceros to a store and kill someone
It is. The only species allowed are dogs and horses and it must be trained to do an action that is not innate to its nature that assists to compensate for the disability. For example, warning someone that a seizure is imminent so they can sit or lie down in order to avoid falling injury. The animal cannot be denied entry into a building unless there's certain safety issues involved (mostly dealing with food), cannot be restricted to certain parts of the business if other people (like other customers) can go into the rest of the building, but can be told to leave if the animal misbehaves.

That is why I wonder what policy is for emotional support animals. The laws surrounding emotional support animals are not as supportive and are mostly at state level. Usually it involves housing. There's no legal mandate that an ESA can go into a business and no species limit for ESAs. Psychiatric service animals are not the same as emotional support animals, as ESAs assist a person just by their innate nature. For example, a psychiatric service dog would be trained to tell when a panic attack is imminent and would lead the person to a place that would be emotionally safer. An emotional support dog would lick the face of the person prior to and during the attack to calm the person, an action that any dog is going to do whenever its person is upset.

However most businesses don't bother to try and distinguish. But the species thing is what I wonder about. A cat, a rat, a lizard, even a rhinoceros could be an ESA. But what happens if someone brings in Fluffy or Spike? Because of the species it's obvious that's not a service animal. But for people who aren't liars, an emotional support animal is a necessity. So....what's Target's policy for ESAs?

@can't touch this Even if Target doesn't allow ESAs, someone could bring in a miniature horse and by law the horse has to be allowed.
 

IWishIKnew

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Service animals are covered by law, the ADA, I believe.

The problem is that everyone and anyone can buy an official-looking vest and call their dog a service dog and there's not much anyone can do about it.

Emotional support animals are not covered under the ADA, and Target doesn't legally need to accommodate them, and we were told Target does not accommodate any animals except service animals.

Officially.
 
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Reminds me of the time one guest was griping about another guest having a cat in their cart and mocking the idea of an emotional support animal. LOD sent me to check what the cat’s status was. It was indeed a support animal, wearing a vest identifying it as such. The guest was relatively distressed because the other complaining guest has tried to get her booted out of places before. I witnessed the cat give the signal to its owner and the owner’s companions that it sensed an oncoming panic attack. I alerted the LOD that it was a legitimate support animal and that it was trained. Complainer got the boot because they started to come over and harass the other guest as I and the cat owner’s companions tried to mitigate the effects of the panic attack.
 

Tessa120

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The problem is that everyone and anyone can buy an official-looking vest and call their dog a service dog and there's not much anyone can do about it.
Vests are not legally required. The dog or horse does not have to be marked in any way.
 

IWishIKnew

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Exactly--they're not required, but anyone can get a vest to make their dog look "official." Whether they are or not.
 
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Most of the guests at my store seem to be fairly ordinary folks but the one memorable WTF moment was this...thing...that I almost bumped into last year. It was wearing ridiculously ugly heel boots, striped stockings, a frilly hoop skirt and bodice that appeared to have something stuffed under it to look like tits. It was of average height but had a head about the size of a grapefruit. I said "excuse me" and it let out a guttural bellow that didn't sound like anything in the normal range of human vocalization. Wew. I'm guessing Uber has expanded its service to other planets since I didn't see a flying saucer in the parking lot.
This whole paragraph was a wild ride, thank you
 
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our store is a pass thru for many celebrities. While I was working I've seen Kevin Hart. Dude is really really short. I dont care much for his act, so I let a team member handle his shinnanigans looking for random sporting goods equipment.
ive also seen two of the Glee actors way back when that show was famous going to our summer outdoor furniture. Dont know their names but it was the gay one and the fat black girl.
Just recently, we spotted alfonso ribeiro shopping with his father. he pretty much walks and talks like Carlton.
Beyonce's mom was also spotted in the make up section.
 
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Service animals are covered by law, the ADA, I believe.

The problem is that everyone and anyone can buy an official-looking vest and call their dog a service dog and there's not much anyone can do about it.

Emotional support animals are not covered under the ADA, and Target doesn't legally need to accommodate them, and we were told Target does not accommodate any animals except service animals.

Officially.
thats good to know. A stupid lady brought her dog in our starbucks and our TPS asked if she could show the papers for the dog to make sure its a service animal.. she said; he is an emotional support. a tiny shaking chihuahua.. is an emotional support while she chat really loud and obnoxious with her friend, and she didnt have to show anything. Our TPS walked away because she looked like she was about to cause a scene. Then she asked for his name, but our tps just ignored her and he went inside the office. And at that point some people who were having their croissants and starbucks close to her moved seats. She did seem a little crazy and probably needed that dog for emotional support. I was on my break, trying to order a drink.
 
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This girl in dark blue lip stick she looked like a clown with her shiny heels and casual clothes I think every guest was watching her walk through target as she is walking back to the registers and one guest started laughing out loud!.....omg this girl had her yoga pants back wards the tag was facing out side in and you can tell the pants are not reversible lol
 
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I believe official best practice is do not question the dogs service status and allow it so long as it doesn’t cause any trouble
This is actually what I was told. In the same way that we can't question a guest for using an electric cart, we can't ask guests about the legitimacy of their service pet, whether or not they need them in there, or if it's even a service animal at all.
 

Tessa120

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Emotional support animal... I think the word you are looking for is “pet”.
Not always. There are genuine ESAs, and they have special housing laws, so government recognized. Service dogs are expensive and many people with psychiatric disorders so severe they need the support also are too disabled to have the jobs that would make a service animal affordable. ESAs fill the gap.

Some people can't even leave their homes without their ESA, their anxiety level is so severe. Others can, but the chances of a panic attack is so high that the ESA could be the difference between hiding in a corner for 10 minutes while the presence of the ESA gets the person calm or an ambulance trip to the emergency room. ESAs can also be an anchor of reality for someone in the grips of mania and give someone with depression a reason to live, to keep fighting. Some people with depression would go without food because shopping is too much energy and yet will find the strength to get cat or dog food and then pick themselves up something while getting the pet food.
 

Black Sheep 214

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Not always. There are genuine ESAs, and they have special housing laws, so government recognized. Service dogs are expensive and many people with psychiatric disorders so severe they need the support also are too disabled to have the jobs that would make a service animal affordable. ESAs fill the gap.

Some people can't even leave their homes without their ESA, their anxiety level is so severe. Others can, but the chances of a panic attack is so high that the ESA could be the difference between hiding in a corner for 10 minutes while the presence of the ESA gets the person calm or an ambulance trip to the emergency room. ESAs can also be an anchor of reality for someone in the grips of mania and give someone with depression a reason to live, to keep fighting. Some people with depression would go without food because shopping is too much energy and yet will find the strength to get cat or dog food and then pick themselves up something while getting the pet food.
All this, and amazing as it sounds, some dogs can tell when an epileptic seizure is coming and alert their person to prepare for it. Not that it applies to having a service dog in the store, but some dogs can smell cancer, too.
 

Tessa120

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All this, and amazing as it sounds, some dogs can tell when an epileptic seizure is coming and alert their person to prepare for it. Not that it applies to having a service dog in the store, but some dogs can smell cancer, too.
Seizure sensing dogs are service animals. Dogs can also sense a blood sugar drop and signal the owner to take glucose tablets and eat.

And as for the aside there's also dogs used in rescues, some sniff people out before they die, others signal it's too late. And Oscar the cat is just freaky.
Oscar (therapy cat) - Wikipedia - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscar_(therapy_cat)
 

IWishIKnew

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This is why we not only can ask what services the dog is trained for, but we should. If the guest does have an issue and their service dog starts barking, we have no fucking clue what's wrong. If they stop us or we stop them to exchange that information, and they do have an issue in-store, it's way better for everyone if we can inform 911 that the guest is epileptic or diabetic and their service dog is alerting us to a seizure or blood sugar crash or whatever it is the dog is trained for.
 
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A business can ask two questions - "Is that a service animal?" and "What has it been trained to do?" Can't ask for papers, can't insist on a demonstration of trained skills, just those two questions. In all honesty though, all you need is the first one. They answer no, you can tell them to leave.
The problem is that every entitled bitch knows we can't ask for proof, so they lie their ass off and say yes, it is a service animal, even as it's pulling on the leash.
I love dogs, but they shouldn't be in food prep areas or where groceries are stored, and bitches with misbehaved dogs lying about them being service animals makes life harder for those that have legitimate need for them. ADA needs to be updated to allow for proof to be required, and attach severe penalties for lying about it.
 

PJ5

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Jan 8, 2015
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All of the time. We have permanent signs up in our store. Leadership is afraid of running out of a flavor before Coke/Pepsi makes a return visit.
Wish they did this at the targets near me, Pepsi is usually always out of stock.
 

Fix It

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Crime, the mentally disturbed, and accidents (fire, major spills, out of the ordinary damage) are unfortunately so common in my area that nobody really looks twice. We’re like “yup that happened” and on to the next.
 
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