Family and Medical Leave Act

Lady Fitting Room

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Jun 23, 2011
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186
#1
A very good friend of mine at work was recently approached by management about signing some paperwork having to do with the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), as she has a recurring health problem that has been acting up especially badly of late. The only thing is, her English is not very good (she is a native Spanish speaker), and no one in management speaks Spanish, so she's asked me if I wouldn't mind going to the ETL-HR with her and discussing the options since she knows nothing about it and is hesitant to sign something without fully understanding. I did some research into it on my own, but I was wondering if anyone here has ever taken a medical LOA and is familiar with this paperwork. Is there anything you can tell me that might help her make the right decision for her health, or are there any specific points she should bring up when talking to HR?
 

talan123

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Jun 16, 2011
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#5
Have her check out the State Laws, they can add to the federal law. The federal statue is the bare minimum that the States can do. Some States go well beyond what the FMLA, such as Massachusetts but they are kind of a freaky state.

I would have her call the State and talk to one of their people in the Labor and Industry (or whatever that state calls it) bureau and see what she needs to know. They do have Spanish translators on 24/7 for free in most cases.

/This applies to all States except Minnesota where the government went bye-bye.
 
OP
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Lady Fitting Room

Free from Target :D
Joined
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Messages
186
#6
Thanks to all for the responses. We went in together the other day and were able to get a lot of good information from the ETL-HR. She's decided to talk things over with her family now that she's informed and will probably go for it.
 
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
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#7
an FMLA is a really great option for team members with a recurring health problem, or for a team member with a sick family members.

Basically, depending on how sick you are, you get a certain amount of days that you can use towards your FMLA (Hewitt handles this, not Target). I mean, it's a lot of days.

If you think you can't make it into work because of your illness, you need to call in to work, and then call Hewitt, so that everyone is on the same page.

Basically, an FMLA creates a lot of communication that protects team members who need to be absent a lot.
 

talan123

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Messages
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#8
When I first started for Target as a temporary employee (seasonal) I had a brain infection that caused me to do weird(er) stuff.

The people at this company were so kind and understanding back then, it's one of the reasons I am still with the company. My dad called in and told them I was in the hospital and there wasn't any questions about availability and when I would be back, it was "What can we do to help him?"

"The biggest mistake in communication is assuming that any has taken place" -Unknown.
 
Joined
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Messages
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#9
the Target Benefits Center talks to the topics of most types of leaves of absence. Some information regarding LOA and FMLA can be found on the eHR Target employee website, and perhaps on Hewitts Pay & Benefits website. Your HR will have quite a bit of information too. FMLA is the Family Medical Leave Act, which was passed in 1992 by President Bill Clinton. If you are within the guidelies of the program, you are allowed between 12 and 16 weeks of excused absences per 12 month period once all the appropriate documentation has been received and approved. Your leave of absence can be consecutive time off, reduced schedule, or intermittent leave. Many of the leaves are paid, depending on whether you meet the requirements, others are unpaid but still give you protected time away from work.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2012
Messages
461
#10
I hope you were able to get the FMLA information you needed.
an FMLA is a really great option for team members with a recurring health problem, or for a team member with a sick family members.

Basically, depending on how sick you are, you get a certain amount of days that you can use towards your FMLA (Hewitt handles this, not Target). I mean, it's a lot of days.

If you think you can't make it into work because of your illness, you need to call in to work, and then call Hewitt, so that everyone is on the same page.

Basically, an FMLA creates a lot of communication that protects team members who need to be absent a lot.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2012
Messages
461
#11
I'm surprised how many people have never heard of this Federal job protection program that Bill Clinton passed 20 years ago! So many people could have benefitted from this program if only employers would have made their employees aware of this opportunity.
A very good friend of mine at work was recently approached by management about signing some paperwork having to do with the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), as she has a recurring health problem that has been acting up especially badly of late. The only thing is, her English is not very good (she is a native Spanish speaker), and no one in management speaks Spanish, so she's asked me if I wouldn't mind going to the ETL-HR with her and discussing the options since she knows nothing about it and is hesitant to sign something without fully understanding. I did some research into it on my own, but I was wondering if anyone here has ever taken a medical LOA and is familiar with this paperwork. Is there anything you can tell me that might help her make the right decision for her health, or are there any specific points she should bring up when talking to HR?
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2012
Messages
461
#12
very true, FMLA is a necessity, especially without union protections.
Have her check out the State Laws, they can add to the federal law. The federal statue is the bare minimum that the States can do. Some States go well beyond what the FMLA, such as Massachusetts but they are kind of a freaky state.

I would have her call the State and talk to one of their people in the Labor and Industry (or whatever that state calls it) bureau and see what she needs to know. They do have Spanish translators on 24/7 for free in most cases.

/This applies to all States except Minnesota where the government went bye-bye.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2012
Messages
461
#13
Hope your situation is good now
A very good friend of mine at work was recently approached by management about signing some paperwork having to do with the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), as she has a recurring health problem that has been acting up especially badly of late. The only thing is, her English is not very good (she is a native Spanish speaker), and no one in management speaks Spanish, so she's asked me if I wouldn't mind going to the ETL-HR with her and discussing the options since she knows nothing about it and is hesitant to sign something without fully understanding. I did some research into it on my own, but I was wondering if anyone here has ever taken a medical LOA and is familiar with this paperwork. Is there anything you can tell me that might help her make the right decision for her health, or are there any specific points she should bring up when talking to HR?
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2012
Messages
461
#14
I hope everyone knows that this program has existed for the past 20 years and that if you have to miss work for medical reasons, you have job protection.
A very good friend of mine at work was recently approached by management about signing some paperwork having to do with the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), as she has a recurring health problem that has been acting up especially badly of late. The only thing is, her English is not very good (she is a native Spanish speaker), and no one in management speaks Spanish, so she's asked me if I wouldn't mind going to the ETL-HR with her and discussing the options since she knows nothing about it and is hesitant to sign something without fully understanding. I did some research into it on my own, but I was wondering if anyone here has ever taken a medical LOA and is familiar with this paperwork. Is there anything you can tell me that might help her make the right decision for her health, or are there any specific points she should bring up when talking to HR?
 
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