Archived Overloading softlines racks?

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JustJoe

"Can you go to 3, please?" *Turns off walkie*
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In our men's department we have a bunch of racks that are unsigned AND overloaded. For example, we have a rack of hanging Merona pants that is packed so full that it is near impossible to zone. There are another 2-3 racks of C9 that are also an unsorted mess. Then there are the clearance racks. I've actually built and filled a new clearance rack just to make the others more shoppable. Apparently our TLs don't care.

My opinion is that some of it should be backstocked, but what do I know?
 
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I agree with you if your racks are overloaded and unshoppable for the guest then you need to send some stuff to backstock. I am assuming your talking about hanging softlines, which your backroom should have hanging softlines backstock areas. It should be organized by style, gender, fill group.
 
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Your ETL may be aware of this but needs more prodding from their TLs. I know a couple stores where the STLs just go ballistic about the idea because people will eventually forget about the products and just let them sit back there for ages. Really, you just need a good culture where the stuff is getting pulled as it sells down, but it's kind of hard to do that when you have 1 opener and closer per night.
 

band_rules16

Former Wave Master
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My old store usually would not let us backstock unless it was winter time, since the snow pants and jackets fall off the racks too quickly. I spent a lot of time "backstocking" hanging softlines (not really backstocking, since it's not located, more just going up on the wave and hanging them in the backroom) last year. Any other time of year, it was on a Z-rack in the back of the line.

We finally had a flow TM step up to make sure those racks were worked out, and they paired with our softlines brand team members. Talk to your softlines ETL and maybe they can prod the TLs some. One of my TLs last year really appreciated the extra work I put in making sure our racks were brand and looking nice. Same with folded items on tables (which you can actually backstock into a location).
 
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This is a problem I've dealt with for years. Best practice for softlines racks is that they should be sized and by brand. You are correct, these racks should not be overloaded, but it never fails to happen. If there is an overabundance of product, you are to have at least a size run of everything, (i.e. S, M, L, XL, XXL) and after a few of each size, the rest should be taken to back stock. They should be jet-railed in your softlines hanging back stock area. Separated by, as backroomdude said, by style, gender and fill group. Best practice also states that once a week, a team member (usually the TL), goes back there and sees what product can be pulled and pushed to the floor. Each department is supposed to have a certain day. I don't remember what they are, but for example Men's is on Monday. So Monday, the TL should go back there, assess the Men's hanging back stock and see what can be pulled. And each day of the week, you check a different department. In my store, we were always taught to push everything to the sales floor. The only time was holiday time when there was simply too much to put out. But as has already been stated, so many ETL's freak out and worry that you will leave your stuff back there forever. When we do back stock the hanging stuff, I think we do a pretty good job. The problem is that no one wants to take the time to jet rail the product and when they do, our back room doesn't take the time to separate the clothes. So you have to hunt for each department. New transitions that you don't have room for, (say swimwear before the VA was set), should also be hung up until the floor moves are being done. I'm hoping that with bounce back we can try to get back to best practices, but we'll see.
 
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