Angry "Extreme" couponers

Tessa120

I escaped the asylum!
Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Messages
2,996
Why is it so hard for you to believe that this is the way my store has always done it (GSTM who has been at my store for 6+ years says that's how she was trained day 1)? If any of the multiple GSTLs, GSAs, ETL GEs, ETL APs, APTMs my store has had in the time I've been there had a problem with it, they would have said something, rather than continuing to tell us to keep doing it that way.
Just because something has always been done a certain way doesn't mean that it's always been done the right way.

People speak of coupon fraud, but this could be considered another form of coupon fraud. Target discounts an item for the amount of the coupon. Example, a box of whoozits is reduced by $3 due to a $3 coupon. The whoozits manufacturer gives Target $3 to make up for what Target lost in the sale. If the whoozits owner returns it then giving them less than the $3 means that Target got the $3 from the manufacturer plus an additional $1 or so that was not given to the customer. If the contract between Target and the manufacturer says that Target will receive only what it lost, then that extra amount is, well, whatever interesting legal word for theft you can think of.

AP is probably trying to figure out how to make the people running coupon scams go away permanently by keeping them from profiting. They probably aren't thinking about contract law and how the legal agreement is being violated. Or maybe they are and they are keeping track of every penny not handed back and are shipping it off to the manufacturer. Or maybe they have a far better understanding of the contracts and there is a clause for Target keeping money from returns. Doubtful for that last part though, if they were privy of such information they would be part of corporate legal department, not store level AP.

But to argue that that's the way it should be, not really, not if you add the numbers and expect that Target has a similar contract to other retailers, where the retail store does not get more money from the manufacturer than they give away. Argue ASANTS sure, but don't say it's the right way to do things. "But it's how we've always done it" is the opening words to a whole lot of things in a whole lot of places that were legally gray or outright illegal and it took a bit for someone to take notice of the questionable actions.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2019
Messages
173
My educated guess, as far as sales audit for coupon redemption, is that when merchandise bought with a manufacturer coupon is returned, Target cannot submit the coupon to the vendor for credit. My wife used to work for a food-products company in their accounts receivable area, and they periodically audited accounts with large companies for what the industry calls "deductions" (credits for submitting manufacturer coupons, or other types of rebate credits). Because the purchase itself was canceled, the coupon redemption is null and void. This is my best guess, because in Target's system the coupon is matched to a specific guest transaction so the coupon value is voided when there's a refund.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2019
Messages
173
Target discounts an item for the amount of the coupon. Example, a box of whoozits is reduced by $3 due to a $3 coupon. The whoozits manufacturer gives Target $3 to make up for what Target lost in the sale. If the whoozits owner returns it then giving them less than the $3 means that Target got the $3 from the manufacturer plus an additional $1 or so that was not given to the customer. If the contract between Target and the manufacturer says that Target will receive only what it lost, then that extra amount is, well, whatever interesting legal word for theft you can think of.
Actually, manufacturers who accept coupons from retailers perform periodic sales audits to verify that a coupon matches a particular sale. My wife used to work in accounts receivable for a well-known food products company and sometimes had to deal with reconciling "deductions" (coupon redemptions and other incentive discounts offered to retailers). So I doubt that Target gets to "keep" the coupon value if the product on the matching transaction is returned and refunded.

By the way, on occasion you'll see coupons where the screen goes red with a message like, "Target cannot accept this coupon". While sometimes this is due to coupon counterfeiting issues, usually there's some dispute between Target and a vendor regarding coupon redemptions. So you'll see an item which clearly matches the coupon, but Target very plainly says we cannot accept the coupon - in full-screen red warning.
 

Tessa120

I escaped the asylum!
Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Messages
2,996
My educated guess, as far as sales audit for coupon redemption, is that when merchandise bought with a manufacturer coupon is returned, Target cannot submit the coupon to the vendor for credit. My wife used to work for a food-products company in their accounts receivable area, and they periodically audited accounts with large companies for what the industry calls "deductions" (credits for submitting manufacturer coupons, or other types of rebate credits). Because the purchase itself was canceled, the coupon redemption is null and void. This is my best guess, because in Target's system the coupon is matched to a specific guest transaction so the coupon value is voided when there's a refund.
But what if the coupons have already been sent off? Then it's double dipping, right?
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2019
Messages
173
But what if the coupons have already been sent off? Then it's double dipping, right?
No. In order for Target to be reimbursed for the coupon, when there's a manufacturer coupon the terms of the manufacturer's reimbursement is that Target must audit its transactions involving coupons for that product. If the product has been returned, at least with a receipt, it's disqualified from reimbursement credit. This is a thorny issue between manufacturers and retailers. Manufacturers demand proof that the product was purchased and not returned, there's a way they can do this through sales audit thanks to advanced computer software. There are times when Target and a manufacturer may have a dispute over coupon redemption, which is why sometimes we see the "red screen" saying we cannot accept a particular coupon even if the item clearly matches the coupon. We really aren't supposed to take the "red screen" coupon, it's against policy although as usual ASANTS.
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2018
Messages
434
No. In order for Target to be reimbursed for the coupon, when there's a manufacturer coupon the terms of the manufacturer's reimbursement is that Target must audit its transactions involving coupons for that product. If the product has been returned, at least with a receipt, it's disqualified from reimbursement credit. This is a thorny issue between manufacturers and retailers. Manufacturers demand proof that the product was purchased and not returned, there's a way they can do this through sales audit thanks to advanced computer software. There are times when Target and a manufacturer may have a dispute over coupon redemption, which is why sometimes we see the "red screen" saying we cannot accept a particular coupon even if the item clearly matches the coupon. We really aren't supposed to take the "red screen" coupon, it's against policy although as usual ASANTS.
That's why this is a corporate issue, not store issue. When and if it loses money, it will be addressed.

You could challenge the return, of course, but the story is the same. "I bought them for relatives as gifts but found out they can't use that type of meds."

We have considered insisting they return at the store where purchased, but even that could be challenged.

What we do is call a "manager," and then post other people to watch. It's clear we know what's going on. It's intimidating. And we hope it shows them off.
 

Times Up

Formerly PassinTime
Joined
Sep 13, 2017
Messages
2,044
Anyone know about our coupons supposedly being weighed? I’ve been told that by several ETLs.
I've been told that for years as well. They are bagged and weighed and sent off to a 3rd party who sorts them and then submits to the manufacturer for reimbursement. Target only gets a fraction of their face value.
 

starmaster1000

Master NCR Torture Device Operator
Joined
May 31, 2018
Messages
820
Y’all know I let ap know everything but even I don’t do it for price match. Attempted coupon fraud and ticket switch you bet I’m letting them know.

I’ll price match more than one if it’s reasonable as others said. Like if they’re buying 2 of the same toy and it’s $5 cheaper I’m not gonna get into it with them.

We adjust down the value of the return to be what they paid And deny allergy medicine with no receipt or even on their card if it’s a lot of them (we can offer to pull the receipt from the back, never had to tho). My store has a huge problem with this, that’s why we’re so strict.
I need to come to your store. My store is a Yes store.
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2018
Messages
189
Actually, manufacturers who accept coupons from retailers perform periodic sales audits to verify that a coupon matches a particular sale. My wife used to work in accounts receivable for a well-known food products company and sometimes had to deal with reconciling "deductions" (coupon redemptions and other incentive discounts offered to retailers). So I doubt that Target gets to "keep" the coupon value if the product on the matching transaction is returned and refunded.

By the way, on occasion you'll see coupons where the screen goes red with a message like, "Target cannot accept this coupon". While sometimes this is due to coupon counterfeiting issues, usually there's some dispute between Target and a vendor regarding coupon redemptions. So you'll see an item which clearly matches the coupon, but Target very plainly says we cannot accept the coupon - in full-screen red warning.
Do you know if the sales audits for coupons also check to see if the coupons were used according to the terms listed (ie. limit certain number of identical coupons per household)? I had a guest attempting to use two identical manufacturer coupons for some medicine (forgot the company) although the coupon said "limit one coupon per household per day". I denied the guest, but she was persistent and asked to speak to a manager. The GSTL came over and explained that Target could lose money if the terms of the coupons weren't followed, but he gave up and allowed the guest to use the same coupon in another transaction.
At this point, I feel sorry for the GSTL because he tried to deny the guest, but the guest wouldn't take no for an answer, using the overused line "the other Target let me" etc. I'm wondering how likely is it that Target loses the money from that coupon. Is it possible that it won't be audited and Target will still get the money for the coupon? Obviously, I don't like breaking the rules for these "guests", but arguing with them after a certain point is unproductive so I'm curious what the end result of this usually is.
 

Amanda Cantwell

Service Advocate
Joined
Mar 27, 2017
Messages
4,187
Do you know if the sales audits for coupons also check to see if the coupons were used according to the terms listed (ie. limit certain number of identical coupons per household)? I had a guest attempting to use two identical manufacturer coupons for some medicine (forgot the company) although the coupon said "limit one coupon per household per day". I denied the guest, but she was persistent and asked to speak to a manager. The GSTL came over and explained that Target could lose money if the terms of the coupons weren't followed, but he gave up and allowed the guest to use the same coupon in another transaction.
At this point, I feel sorry for the GSTL because he tried to deny the guest, but the guest wouldn't take no for an answer, using the overused line "the other Target let me" etc. I'm wondering how likely is it that Target loses the money from that coupon. Is it possible that it won't be audited and Target will still get the money for the coupon? Obviously, I don't like breaking the rules for these "guests", but arguing with them after a certain point is unproductive so I'm curious what the end result of this usually is.
Honestly even if we lose the money it’s not like it’s gonna run target out of business. I would’ve denied per coupon too as a GSTM, but I can understand why your GSTL did what they did.

A line I like to use: “I can’t speak to why other ™/target did XYZ, but I have to follow the policy”. That usually works for some reason
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2018
Messages
189
Honestly even if we lose the money it’s not like it’s gonna run target out of business. I would’ve denied per coupon too as a GSTM, but I can understand why your GSTL did what they did.

A line I like to use: “I can’t speak to why other ™/target did XYZ, but I have to follow the policy”. That usually works for some reason
In the grand scheme of things, you're right and I shouldn't be bothered by guests ignoring policy and getting away with it, but I was still wondering how those coupon terms are enforced.
 
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