Archived Electronics Help

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Hey! I was just recently put into electronics with no real training and no prior experience in that department. I have been able to pick up some stuff on my own but there are a few things I'm lost about.

What is a ESP?
Occasionally I am asked by my TLOD what percentage we are at with AAR, how would I know when I am at a solid 100% with hardware and attachments?
 
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The Electronics Champion Training is a fantastic learning tool if you don't have an existing knowledge of Electronics!

As far as Attachment rate, you can check that on Workbench, under Performance and Store Reports.

The general rule of thumb with them, is that you want "2+1" on any major item. The "+1" would be your ESP, or Extended Service Plan; while the "2" is any general accessory. HDMI Cables, Surge Protectors, Screen Protectors, Cases, Memory Cards, Games, Controllers; Anything along those lines.

Brand new 32" TV? Get that Surge Protector, HDMI Cable, and don't forget the 3 year Extended Service Plan that we offer!

As a tip... Play with the product. Learn about it. Reading those information cards is fantastic and gives you all the basic information... but if a guest wanted a card read; They could do it themselves. Being successful in Electronics involves actually knowing the product you'll be selling, more so than any other department.
 
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thanks for responding. Is the Electronics Champion Training something I need to ask my TLOD about? Also is there anyway to tell what items I can sell with the service plans?


Again thanks for the help. I feel like I was just thrown into electronics with no real guidance. Which is really frustrating.
 
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GlobalJ

Electronics TM
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On the subject on ESP's I should add our tablet protection plan is the best around. It covers drops, spills, broken screens (stuff that's not covered under most manufacturer warranties) along with it breaks internally, etc. I'd read up on this and really push it, especially if you sell a large number of iPads!
 

seasonal

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Going to be honest with you and say brush up on your electronic knowledge. If you don't know about a product get some details on it. There will always be guest asking "Whats' the difference between these two?" and if you don't know they will call you out on it. I remember someone working in electronics that didn't know anything, and a guest told him "why are you back here if you don't know anything"
 

commiecorvus

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The most important part is asking questions.
Find out what they really need as opposed to what they say they need.
You're going to be a whole lot better off selling them the right thing the first time rather than having them have to come back for it.
Cables are a big one on that area, do your research so you can answer questions and make sure they get the right ones.
You'll find that you know a lot more than you realize if you are half way computer literate but learn what you can about routers and the latest tablets as well.
Cnet is a good place to start, PC world isn't bad, also check out Consumer Reports.
 

FlowMonkey

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On the subject on ESP's I should add our tablet protection plan is the best around. It covers drops, spills, broken screens (stuff that's not covered under most manufacturer warranties) along with it breaks internally, etc. I'd read up on this and really push it, especially if you sell a large number of iPads!

dont forget surge protection as well, unless they have removed that from the ESPs since I worked dayside
 

lish35

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I was in almost the same situation as you, I got thrown in and then did the electronics champion training after a couple of weeks. Try to make it personal, I have had a lot of success by telling the guests my experience with some items (e.x. earbuds, ipods, video games). The gaming protection plan is another really good value too, as it covers the console and up to five games purchased at target (easiest to get with the ds). I don't how it is at your store, but at mine we have a binder with every metric (AAR, service scores, survey) in it.
 

buliSBI

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Depending on your Electronics setup, the most basic training to learn is to demo any displayed items (TVs, cameras)

Good thing you will not have to memorize product information. Most products will have specification information with the display or on box. Just be prepared to identify that info and explain it in simple terms.

You may want to research some terms before taking the quiz.
TVs: Resolution, Interlaced (i)/Progressive (p), LCD/LED, refresh rates, 24/30 fps
Cameras: Megapixel resolution, dpi, Stabilization, Digital/Optical Zoom, Li-Ion or reg. battery powered.
Memory Cards: SD, SDHC, Memory Card, XD, microSD, adapters, Card size (GB), grade rating
Camcorders: HD capability, resolution, special functions, sensor
Video Players: DVD/Blu-Ray/VHS
Cables: Co-axial, RCA (Composite). RGB (Component), S-Video, HDMI, USB, Monitor, power
Any iPOD, hard drives, media player: Drive size (MB/GB/TB)
Gaming systems: Wii, Xbox, Playstation

There should be an attachment guide on what secondary items can attach to what primary items.
 

mrknownothing

purveyor of things
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Jun 10, 2011
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One thing that may help you is becoming backroom certified if you're not already. This comes in handy if a guest wants to buy a TV and there's nobody in the backroom. Plus, the backroom team will appreciate it because they can do their pulls and backstock in peace without having to pull an item for you every 5 min.

I remember someone working in electronics that didn't know anything, and a guest told him "why are you back here if you don't know anything"

My bad. :D
 

antivibe

Salesfloor TL
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Nov 2, 2012
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417
Electronics is easy, you just have to know the basics.

SRP stands for Service Replacement Plan. They might look like these or somewhat similar to these.

To successfully sell these you have to memorize what they DO and DON'T cover. You also have to memorize how much each one costs.
Example: A customer buying a $45 item can get the 2 year replacement plan (yellow) for $4.
You should have a cheat sheet that lists the prices of the SRPs at the boat. But it doesn't hurt to memorize them, that way you can inform the guest before you reach the boat or answer any questions w/o having to look for one.

Attachments are pretty simple. Just think of all the accessories that go with the main item.
Example: Camera = memory card, camera case, tripod, etc. TV = HDMI cables, surge protection, wall mount, etc.

If you don't know too much about an item then read the box. Most of the time that helps, if not then ask another TM.

I have a few questions for Electronics folks.
1. My old Electronics TL used to sell SRPs on Music CDs or anything. Does the 2 Year Replacement plan actually cover CDs? Doesn't POS stop you from selling an SRP on non coverable items?

2. When POS asks if you would like a service plan with that $4 TV remote and you hit NO. Does that lower the AAR/SRP score? I'm guessing the answer is yes, but who the hell buys a replacement plan on a $4 item?
 
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