Archived Interview - how long should answers be?

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
141
I have an interview coming up for a different position and I am not exactly the best at them. I know about the 3 part answers and to be sure to address all 3 parts. But I was wondering, how long should an answer be? Some situations take a little more time to explain before getting to the "what I did" and the "outcome" parts. I want to make sure I explain my answer fully, but I don't want it to ramble on and on. You know? Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated!
 
Joined
Dec 26, 2011
Messages
57
I have an interview coming up for a different position and I am not exactly the best at them. I know about the 3 part answers and to be sure to address all 3 parts. But I was wondering, how long should an answer be? Some situations take a little more time to explain before getting to the "what I did" and the "outcome" parts. I want to make sure I explain my answer fully, but I don't want it to ramble on and on. You know? Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated!

I would say I'm okay with interviews but I have never done interviews from within so I can be totally wrong on this but I'll give it a shot. Your interview could relate to the position you applied for, and I would believe you have seen what this position will require of you and somewhat of a to do list expected on a daily basis. With that said, create questions out of scenarios you have seen or can expect to see from this position, and after doing so, see how you would handle it. Make sure you keep your answers short and to the point, smile and I'm glad to see you're preparing yourself! I've had coworkers go in for an interview unprepared and feel they'll be promoted bc the TL/ETL already knows who they are and what their workmanship is like. I'll stay tuned in for this thread because I'm also on the same boat as you! :party2:
 

pellinore

Life sucks and nothing good can come of it.
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
1,997
Length of answers is difficult....just make sure to tell the important details....tell them the issue (don't worry about telling them where it happened or the names and details of everyone or if the problem happened numerous times.) Tell them what you did and then the outcome. Details are not very important, just the problem. For example...1) one time I had a guest that was very angry that she wasn't able to find an item in the store and hadn't been able to find someone to help her out. 2)I apologized to the guest and told her that "I'd be happy to help you find the item." Since I wasn't sure about the item myself, I used my walkie to ask others about the item or what its location was and was told that "we don't carry that item." I told the guest the answer...and then apologized again. Then asked if there was anything else I might be able to do for her. 3) Eventhough we didn't have the item, the guest was happy because now she had found someone to help her, and make her feel that we cared about her and and she saw that I had made a great effort to help her.

OK, so not a great example, but I think you get the drift. You don't have to provide details about where you were in the store or what the guest was looking for....just the facts....angry guest (apologized to guest)....helped guest.....happy guest.

Hope this helps!
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
877
I agree with pellinore. Don't get too wrapped up in too many details about the situation, just tell enough so your interviewer gets the general idea of what happened.
Try to come up with some scenarios for the various leadership expectations and you'll be good to go. Even better, however, if you prepare with your TL or ETL.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top