Pharmacy

#1
I have been offered a job to work as a pharmacy tech. I am currently a GSA and service desk. What are the benefits of working in the pharmacy instead of the front lanes?
 
#2
More pay. Multitasking & sick guests.
Closing at 6pm on weekends & 9pm during the week.
Opening at 9am everyday.
Getting knowledge & experience can lead to other job opps outside of spot, if your get certification.
You might be a cashier there.
 
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redeye58

Hasta Ba Rista, Baby!
#4
Target covers your training & after you get your certification, you can be Rx tech with ANY pharmacy, not just Target.
 

ach5063

Former Super x-trained TM
#6
Pharm is AWESOME! Haha, i cant wait til i'm moved from being a backup. While i love my Sbux, I'm thrilled when i get to work in the Pharm. Take the job and enjoy it. You'll love it! You also get to know your "regular" guests. And i just feel it's a more personal work space!
 
#7
More pay. Multitasking & sick guests.
Closing at 6pm on weekends & 9pm during the week.
Opening at 9am everyday.
Getting knowledge & experience can lead to other job opps outside of spot, if your get certification.
You might be a cashier there.
Depending on which store it is, it might be even earlier...some close at 7 during the week, 5 on Saturday, and have 11-5 hours on Sunday :thumbsup:
 

redeye58

Hasta Ba Rista, Baby!
#11
Hey guys,

What kind of training is offered to new pharmacy techs with no experience?
There's a training plan that consists of several components w/testing for each one. Took me about 2 hrs. You learn the 5 steps of Rx processing from intake to the final check-out w/the guest, emphasis on HIPPA, current FDA restrictions on pseudoephedrine purchases & the like.
 
#12
Mamak1 is our current expert. Post her help.
I don't know that I'd call myself an "expert", but thanks for the vote of confidence :thumbsup:
There's a training plan that consists of several components w/testing for each one. Took me about 2 hrs. You learn the 5 steps of Rx processing from intake to the final check-out w/the guest, emphasis on HIPPA, current FDA restrictions on pseudoephedrine purchases & the like.
Yes, like redeye said, this is about it as far as "formal" training goes. Now with flu-shots coming, there's also one on those. Other than that, it's all pretty much hands-on. You should be assigned a "trainer" who will go over the rest...where certain drugs are kept (the ones that are used most often *aka "fast movers" are usually kept separate), how to fill, labeling, computer training (AFA processing scripts, insurance, guest info, etc), reporting, returns, ordering, etc. How quickly you go through all of this is basically dependent on two things: the volume of your pharmacy and how adept you are at "picking things up". The one thing I can't stress enough is ACCURACY. Don't worry about doing things quickly (that will come with time), worry about doing things correctly. Nothing makes a pharmacist more irate than a tech that constantly makes mistakes :disappoint:

Oh, and if you're "new to Target" altogether, you'll have to go through cashier training as well ;)

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask me here or send me a private message :)
 
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thee

Walmart CSM
#15
Hello, I am currently working at a Walmart Pharmacy and to be honest I really like it. I have been with Walmart for over a year in the Pharmacy and have enjoyed every minute of it. That begin said, my hours had to be cut way back because we moved to a new store and our script volume went down. I talked to my current manager and asked them how they would feel if I were to go work at Target in the Pharmacy. My manager said that they would be behind me and give me an exemplary reference. I then went and talked to a Pharmacy Manager at Target, and asked him if he had any openings. He told me that he currently did not, but had me give him my number saying that he would call me when he had something. I know Walmart has an awesome computer system with a short learning curve ,and I am kind of interesting in hearing what Target uses. I have heard that it is a little outdated, and maybe hard to use? I also am interested in the workflow and general ways that you do things. I think it looks fun to work at Target, (ideally I could work both places, but "conflict of interest") I just want to know a little bit more about how you do things before I take a job and need to "re-learn" how to do things.
 
#16
Welcome Wally world tm! The learning modules isn't really outdated. They are fairly current. It sounds that you are a pharmacy cert tech person. It may depend on your state laws for how much you are allow to do.
Spot pharmacy is a great place to learn & help guests. At my store, our techs have been there for more than 5 years. Because they love it. Mamak1 is a cert tech. I did the pharamcy training for the cashier side. So I don't have much info on details.
 
#17
Sorry, hardlinesmaster, I have to disagree...PDX is COMPLETELY outdated compared to what other pharmacies are currently using and have been told from interns who have come to our store after being at others that it's not easy to learn after using one of the "windows based" systems. Once you get the basics down, it's not too bad, but there are QUITE a few "bugs" in it, which is common in DOS based systems. I've heard RedRx is slightly better, but haven't actually used it yet myself, so can't really comment on that. AFA workflow, I'm sure it's basically the same...receive, fill, check, release. There are also reports, returns, etc., but those are fairly easy to do as they're pretty straightforward and I guess at most pharmacies, the pharmacists do a majority of them.

Each store does things slightly different so I can only comment on how my store does it (and hardlinesmaster is right, your state may have laws limiting how much you can do as a tech), but our ETL-Rx entrusts us to do quite a bit....pretty much everything they aren't required by law to do (check, counsel, and take/give copies over the phone). We process Rxs, enter guest information, contact insurance companies, fill, reshelve meds, do the order, answer the phones, run reports, process refill requests, receive, release, mix concentrates, etc. I recently found out that some stores only allow the techs to receive/release, fill, reshelve, answer the phones, and process refill requests...the pharmacists process all scripts (primarily to deal with the "bugs" mentioned previously) on top of checking, counseling, doing copies, reports, mixing, etc.). Interestingly enough, we are one of the top pharmacies in our district and they are one of the lowest....

If you want to know anything specific, feel free to send me a private message or post again here, happy to help :)
 

thee

Walmart CSM
#19
In my state, techs need only be registered, no certification requirements, and the only things we cannot do is counsel (no spell check :-/) we also cannot do the final check of the script before it is bagged, there are other things Walmart will not let us do so as to safeguard the script a little bit more, (only the pharmacist can bag a script, but I hear we are going to some barcoding thing and we will bag the script.) Also, techs at Walmart near the end of the year are going to start wearing professional clothes and ditching the kahki and blue. Any chance ofthat happenig at target?
 

thee

Walmart CSM
#20
Sorry to ask so much, :) but hey I'm one curious cat. At Walmart, we have what's called "zonership" basically we are assigned an area of work for the day and that is our station: dropoff/input, fill, troubleshoot, various other things, drug order, log copies... Is this how target works too? Or at target are you responsible for the completion of every step of a script? Does it depend on the laws of the state, or is there a type of "zonership" at Target too? I know that there are going to be changes from every place I work, but I guess I am scared of needing a total brainwash. :) (not that a total brainwash is going to kill me, bit still hah!)
 
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