Archived Cashiering?

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Jun 8, 2014
Messages
1
I'm a new target team member and they stuck me as a cashier, which I would be fine with if it didn't hurt my back and feet so badly. I have scoliosis, along with corrective rods and screws in my back and I know that's where some of the pain is coming from. I also hear other cashiers complaining about their back and feet pain after long shifts. Today was only my second day and I had a 5 and a half hour shift and about 4 hours into it I was in so much pain I was sweating badly, shaking and I almost thought I was going to get sick or blackout...(I don't have the most comfortable shoes in the world which probably adds to the issue but I'll get inserts this weekend). But I was wondering, does it get any better? Do you eventually just get used to the pain? I really like everyone at work so far and I would hate to have to quit because I'm hurting all the time.

I apologize in advance if this thread is already posted elsewhere.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2013
Messages
6,820
Not normal. Do not think you need to get used to pain like that. Sure a stiff back happens if you are not used to it. I know my back doesn't like that hunched over stance you can have depending on the register and your height. But you shouldn't be sick with pain from it..

Look at your shoes, and maybe a visit with your doc to talk about it, to see if your cashiering is aggravating your hardware and go from there.
 

Cel

Jack of All Trades
Joined
Nov 16, 2013
Messages
585
Cashiering hurts my back and feet as well, even the limited amounts I do it as a GSA (usually no more than 30-60 minutes at a stretch depending on how dumb the daily scheduling is and how badly callouts have screwed us). Not to that extent, but I don't have scoliosis or corrective hardware for it. Might want to talk to a doc if your shoes don't improve anything (foot pain probably a bit, dunno about the back though) - If it's being aggravated pretty sure spot has to provide reasonable accommodation for you or transfer you to another workcenter.
 
Joined
Mar 19, 2014
Messages
340
I'm a new target team member and they stuck me as a cashier, which I would be fine with if it didn't hurt my back and feet so badly. I have scoliosis, along with corrective rods and screws in my back and I know that's where some of the pain is coming from. I also hear other cashiers complaining about their back and feet pain after long shifts. Today was only my second day and I had a 5 and a half hour shift and about 4 hours into it I was in so much pain I was sweating badly, shaking and I almost thought I was going to get sick or blackout...(I don't have the most comfortable shoes in the world which probably adds to the issue but I'll get inserts this weekend). But I was wondering, does it get any better? Do you eventually just get used to the pain? I really like everyone at work so far and I would hate to have to quit because I'm hurting all the time.

I apologize in advance if this thread is already posted elsewhere.

Hi there!
Does your store have those mats to stand on so you're not standing on the concrete floor?

Maybe you can get a doctor's note that says you can only work 4 hr shifts. HR can change a setting so that the schedule will only pull you for 4 hr shifts. We had a lady who could only handle about 5 hrs and then her shoulder and wrists would get really painful.

In the meantime, here are a couple of things I do to help with my back (I'm 5'2").
*Guests tend to lay all of their stuff on the belt area closest to them. I reach over and pull it all toward me so I'm not repeatedly reaching for items.
*Take off all hangers at one time and then scan the items.
*I've started scanning the clothing items and then folding them in front of me and stacking them up. This way I'm not constantly scanning, folding, leaning over to place in bag. Just be careful that the tag doesn't land on the scanner so it scans it again. lol
*For guests who have heavy/bulky items in or under their cart, I say "You can pull your cart down to the end and I'll come out and scan it". This way you don't have to lean over the belt to try and reach the UPC. Plus it lets you walk a few steps and stretch your legs. Also helps to check what else may have been left in their cart.
*I hate it when guests just lay their hand basket full of stuff on the belt. (OK, let ME get that for you! *lazy!*) I tip it toward me and just start scanning their stuff.
*Ask to go to the bathroom so you can sit, even if it's only for 5 minutes. lol
*When there's a slow time, walk around a bit. Walk to other endcaps and straighten up, put carts/hand baskets back where they belong.

Good luck! Let us know how it turns out. :)
 

Cel

Jack of All Trades
Joined
Nov 16, 2013
Messages
585
I feel like being taller is a hindrance when it comes to cashiering. I'm just shy of 6' and my lower back takes a beating from it all since literally almost nothing about it except for operating the POS itself doesn't involve bending, leaning, stooping, etc. I suppose they have to make it lower to accommodate shorter guests, children, those on electric carts/in wheelchairs/etc. but it sucks for me.
 

mrknownothing

purveyor of things
Joined
Jun 10, 2011
Messages
10,148
I was hired as a cashier, and it did eventually get better for me........when they stopped scheduling me at the front end.

I feel like being taller is a hindrance when it comes to cashiering. I'm just shy of 6' and my lower back takes a beating from it all since literally almost nothing about it except for operating the POS itself doesn't involve bending, leaning, stooping, etc. I suppose they have to make it lower to accommodate shorter guests, children, those on electric carts/in wheelchairs/etc. but it sucks for me.

Cashing was always rough for me too; I'm about 6-2. Now that I'm on the sales floor, my height comes in handy every now and then. :D
 
Joined
Jun 6, 2013
Messages
1,546
I too have problems with my back & don't want more surgery. Here's my advice. Try not to lift anything heavy. I'm super polite and friendly but I don't lift heavy stuff when I cashier. Most of the time I can catch them before they set the 40 lb cat litter on the belt. I say, "You can leave that in the cart and I'll scan it. That will save you some lifting." If they flop something heavy on the belt I scan it then say, "OK I got your water. Thank you!" Sometimes I have to say it twice but they usually get the hint. I've even asked, "Do you mind taking that back?" or "I'm going to let you take that back if you don't mind." I'm cheerful and friendly plus I'm old, lol so it works for me. Hope that helps & welcome!
 
Joined
Oct 12, 2013
Messages
588
And get good shoes!!!! That is the key until you are used to standing, moving around when you can helps too. Go zone the soda coolers if you have too.

It's rough, good shoes will help (I'm currently wearing some keen tennis shoes I had, because I wore out my timberland pro work shoes), you might not get a lot of 5 hour shifts with mytime which will further help. Talk to HR if it doesn't get easier.

Best of luck, my two older kids have scoliosis, the oldest avoided surgery, my middle one won't be so lucky we think.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top